10 years of Winery Consulting – What I learned

A Wine Marketing & PR Perspective

I was asked recently how I got started in the wine business. My experience is not unlike many small producers who transitioned from other business lives, learned on the job, but had the determination necessary to be successful. I am fortunate and appreciative to have worked with over 50 wineries in some capacity, initially as a DTC marketing consultant and starting in 2012 as winery publicist.

Marking 10 years doing anything is milestone, especially in the wine business given the pace of change we’ve seen. Wineries continue to recreate themselves by embracing marketing best practices and technology innovations. The pace of change has picked up with no end in sight. The one constant we can all bank on are relationships. If you’re a publicist, it’s the relationships you develop over a long period of time with writers, media outlets, winery and travel associations and occasionally with other publicists and marketers. If you’re a winery, relationships that matter most are with your customers, staff, wholesalers, other service providers, and the wine community. Going forward I’m guessing that people will continue to matter most, followed by product and wrapped in good marketing and brand promotion. Here are some general observations related to small production wineries in Oregon, over the past 10 years.

2009 – The way things were

  • DTC marketing – a relatively new channel for small producers with little distribution. Focus on tasting room openings and wine clubs, starting mailing lists, email marketing and social media
  • We’re farmers – most common response to queries about marketing plans
  • Marketing plans and consulting services – those were for real businesses! And, we used to sell out in past years!
  • Paid Content – print advertising is still widely used for winery promotions
  • Wine clubs – not as prevalent – 70% had some form, many needing revision
  • Websites – many wineries upgrade to WordPress and other content self-management systems
  • Social media was a new thing – common responses included – It’s not for us. Do I need to do this?
  • Holiday weekend sales were legendary – reports of $15,000-$20,000 weekends were common
  • Staffing – Few hospitality managers and very few digital marketing managers
  • Brand Building – relied on distributors. Distribution mix to DTC was 80% to 20%
  • Distribution consolidation – started with 2008-2010 recession. Small Wineries phased out of markets. Focus turns to smaller cities and regional markets. Much effort expended on market trips
  • Wine quality – still varies by producer. Collaboration on techniques is improving uneven quality
  • Media Coverage – wineries are occasionally being discovered. Active media outreach is minimal
  • Great recession ceases in 2010-2011. U.S. stock markets reach record high. Confidence, optimism and new investment returns

2012 to 2018 – It’s getting competitive

  • Owned Content – wineries focus on updated websites, blogs, social media, news, photos, videos and designed collateral
  • Regional, AVA and Tourism Associations – emerge as marketing organizations with enhanced budgets from new member dues, grant funding, fundraising
  • Experiential marketing – became a thing around 2015, which leads to hiring of hospitality, tasting room and club managers as the new standard in tasting room staffing. Multiple “experiences” offered
  • Winery specific software – facilitates target marketing and customer relationship management. Development of applications and technology create opportunities for hospitality staff to customize customer experience and interactions. Website analytics allows tracking of activities and results
  • Competition – new vineyard planting and winery brands proliferate due to factors including changing weather, quality and integrity reputation, and significant outside investment
  • Channel Mix – is evolving to 20% Distribution and 80% DTC
  • Wine quality – quality is a “point of entry” for consumer sales, and is widely accepted due to production experience, collaboration & technical advances
  • Media Coverage – wineries recognize the need to stand out in a crowded marketplace, and recognize brand building as their responsibility, although take a passive approach to promoting themselves. Winery associations offer members exposure to media activities, contacts and inquiries.

2019 until?

  • Branded versus Grower-Producer – the influence of winemaker personalities will diminish as well-funded large wine groups out-spend, out-price, and out-market small brands
  • Consumer visitation – becomes longer and more focused. Extended visits equate to less tasting room traffic, as people stay longer, visit fewer wineries but have higher quality experiences. Conversion rates increase, although less traffic equates to fewer opportunities for club sign-ups and new digital subscribers
  • Wine Club Retention – remains as issue as consumer have much choice and are gaming the system. Loss prevention becomes strategic for DTC management
  • Online Sales – this DTC sales channel has much underrealized potential. More wineries will activate eCommerce programs as an additional revenue source, and to manage customer contacts, interests, transactions and history. The overall customer relationship will be highly managed
  • Staffing – scarcity of trained and qualified staff is an issue, whether within the wine industry or hospitality industry. This calls out the need for sales automation and technology investment
  • Digital Marketing – 2019 and beyond will see the hiring of digital marketing managers as the most important role, in coordinating all marketing functions with a focus and emphasis on e-commerce.
  • Media Coverage – the need to develop “Top of Mind” awareness becomes apparent. Wineries will begin to add communications professionals to staff, at least in a part time role. Active media outreach and brand promotion campaigns will be coordinated with digital marketing staff
  • Channel Mix – some producers give up on distribution and moved to 100% DTC

These are halcyon days for the wine business. Who knows what the next economic cycle will bring? Consumers have disposable income and purchases of $80-$100 bottles are not uncommon. Update and invest in your business now, while the going is exceptionally good.

 

 

The Times, They Are a-Changin’

The 2013 vineyard land rush in Willamette Valley

Yes, that Bob Dylan song is still relevant today after almost 50 years since its release. The jury is still out and will be for some time, on how the vineyard land rush in Willamette Valley will affect the wine industry and culture here. I’m hopeful that large corporate players will acclimate to our collaborative way of doing things. I have a vested interest in that as I’ve been making a living for over 5 years now in Willamette Valley and like things the way they are. I have some concerns longer term however.

I can’t help but wonder about the optimism expressed by many in our community about all of the outside investment we’re experiencing in 2013. I want to believe that things won’t change. Vineyard and Winery owners said the same thing 40 years ago in Napa Valley. Yes, this is certainly a confirmation of the legacy that has been built by many pioneers and folks committed to growing grapes and producing wine in Oregon. Yet, Oregon vineyard land is still a value play, and an opportunity for large producers to add high priced niche brands to their portfolios.

I decided to seek the studied opinions of wine industry people that I know and respect. I tapped Alan Goldfarb for his view from Napa Valley (full disclosure: He’s my partner in our media consultancy business). Alan is a 25 year wine journalist and publicist who covered Napa Valley for the St. Helena Star and AppellationAmerican.com amongst many others. I also reached out to several local wine industry folks for their thoughts and opinions. You’ll find some areas of concern and lots of reasons for hope. Keep your eyes on this dynamic region, and fingers crossed for the best. Bob Dylan offers lyrical advice that may be relevant for all of us in the wine industry here. “You better start swimming or you’ll sink like a stone, because times, they are a-changin’”.

One perspective from Napa Valley

“It’s an old story” say Alan Goldfarb, “I’m guessing that 75% of Napa winery brands are corporate owned and of those, 25% are internationally owned. That leaves 25% that are true family wineries. Is Oregon headed down this path? In Napa, prices were driven up over time – for property, grapes, wine and labor. Locals say it’s not a small town any longer. As Napa moved toward mono-culture (less Ag diversity), small farmers were put out of business, there were adverse impacts to the land; including singular types of bugs and disease”.

Goldfarb says, “One of the reasons why many of the wines seem the same in Napa is that terroir is being mitigated by what is happening in the cellar. Can this happen, and how long before it does in Willamette Valley? It may take a generation, but it’s beginning to happen. This is a manifestation of the success of Willamette Valley, and we all know that money and the political clout chases success. That said, what is there to be done about it?”

Opinions abound from local growers and winemakers

Note – the proceeding is a compilation of winery owners and growers in Willamette Valley that expressed opinions and agreed to be quoted on the subject (full disclosure: several of the folks quoted here are clients of my wine marketing and/or PR services businesses).

David Adelsheim, Adelsheim Vineyard

Regarding the Domain Drouhin venture into Oregon in the late 1980’s – “It raised the bar for the wineries, it raised the bar for other looking in at what Oregon was doing, it gave gravitas, seriousness, to the industry, which up until that time had been a bunch of people who had been underfinanced”.

Ken Wright, Ken Wright Cellars

“This is another incredible validation of the quality of Pinot Noir coming from our region.  The fact that Jadot, a venerable producer from Burgundy, chose Oregon as their first purchase outside of their homeland says everything about their respect for our wine. As we did with Domaine Drouhin, they will be welcomed with open arms and embraced in our community”.

Don Hagge, Vidon Vineyard

“Corporate wine investors need large tracts of land, to yield enough wine to satisfy the requirements of large retail outlets, and to make an impact on their bottom line. Kendall Jackson went to South Willamette Valley for that reason – three 500 acre parcels. In North Willamette the subdivisions and parcels are much smaller and have many individual owners so they will be harder to assimilate. The land is also more expensive for that reason and attractive to life style investors”.

John Grochau, Grochau Cellars

“I think it is a good thing.  While we have made a lot of headway in the last decade, we are still a ‘niche region’. These new investors have large distribution networks and deep pockets to push Oregon Pinot Noir further into the consumer’s mind”.

“That said, this will make it harder on wineries that are my size (less than 5,000 cases). A lot of vineyard land has been purchased, land that has supplied many wineries with grapes. Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris have become harder to find and the prices are going up. All of this puts more pressure on small businesses, as we run on thinner margins and don’t have buying power. Relationships with growers are more crucial than ever in this type of business climate.  I count myself lucky to have been working with many of my growers for 5-10 years”.

Tom Feller, Artisanal Cellars

“You know this is the classic question. As we become more successful and more highly regarded as a wine growing/making region, more outside groups enter the market.  This both grows our market and leads to some producers being forced out, both small and large”.

“In some ways I think the bigger question is, what is the future of the wine industry in general? It seems we are seeing more big producers acquiring wineries in wide number of global regions – Chateau Ste. Michelle or the Jackson Family for example. Couple this with the national distribution market being controlled by two major companies and I think this outside investment could make it more difficult for small producers to compete in the national market. The issue of wine market consolidation and shrinking of distribution channel is happening whether new groups enter Oregon or not”.

“But on the upside, I believe that with this increase in national visibility, these companies can help the region in terms of tourism. I think for a small producer, building a more direct relationship with consumers is the key to our long term success. We are still a very tiny part of the national wine production and we need to grow to be more present in wine consumer’s minds. If these investors leverage the uniqueness and quality of the place then it can only help the region’s visibility nationally and globally in the long run”.

 Wayne Bailey, Youngberg Hill Vineyards

“In summary, I would say it will put us on the map. That may seem like a strange comment, but it continues to surprise even me how few people across the country and across the world know that we have a thriving wine industry in Oregon, let alone world class Pinot Noir from the Willamette Valley. Even a wine blogger like Snooth, clearly feels the NW does not produce wines worth seeking. And because we produce such a small amount of wine, exposure to Oregon Pinot Noir is still quite limited.

Therefore, the investment of Jackson Family Fine Wines and Louis Jadot (in addition to Chateau St. Michelle and DDO) will bring much need awareness and marketing clout to our wine community. In addition, a producer like Jackson will bring a different scale of production that will get more Willamette Valley Pinot Noir to the masses, bringing much needed exposure”.

“Will it affect the culture? It won’t change the mindset of the hundreds of us that are small family farmers, considering each other as neighbors, and working together to further our cause. Hopefully, the new players will acclimate to the culture of grape growing and production here and, at the same time, change our myopic marketing mentality”.

Mark Huff, Stag Hollow Vineyard

“Size really does matter in this case. Oregon wine industry has over 400 wine producers, and a majority are small, and many are thriving.  Unlike many other U.S. industries, consumers seek out small family run winery operations because they still have direct access and can connect with us, hear our stories. As the Oregon wine industry continues to grow, there will be a natural evolution to larger and larger operations dominating the face of the Oregon wine industry and its marketing arm.  As a result, the share of the marketing spirit that small producers bring to brand “Oregon” will be at-risk of slowly shrinking away unless a unified effort is put forth to develop specific long-term marketing strategies directed at small and even moderate size family producers. Hopefully the unique community culture we’ve built in the Oregon wine industry will survive.”

Kevin Johnson, DION Vineyard

“Well, you should probably get someone who buys Southern Oregon fruit on record, but, in a nutshell, Southern Oregon fruit should costs less – ton for ton – than Willamette Valley fruit.  Southern Oregon land prices are generally cheaper and the sites are generally warmer, which means they can ripen more fruit.  Smaller numerator, bigger denominator. Their transportation costs will be somewhat higher – but not so much as to overcome the cost/ton advantage over the Willamette Valley”.

“To compete with that difference in fixed costs – i.e. mortgages – Willamette Valley growers will likely try to find a way to increase the prices paid for their fruit. Those of us in the sub-AVA’s – Chehalem Mountains, Dundee Hills, etc., will probably continue to emphasize their AVA’s, a shift that is already underway. For all the growers outside the sub-AVA’s however, the only differentiation available is the Willamette Valley AVA.  So I would expect an effort to emphasize the difference that those growing regions have and new AVA’s as well”.

“This works in France – Burgundy to Cote de Nuit to Vosne-Romanee to La Tache – as an example – of price stepping up with differentiation. I’m not sure how well it’s going to work for Oregon – yet”.

Marketing Wine to ‘The Media’

Tom Wark’s recent blog post weighs the differences between traditional and social media: Social vs Traditional Media in Wine Marketing It is an excellent summary of the importance of taking a balanced approach to telling your story and getting your brand’s message reviewed. The Press or traditional wine journalists may be diminishing in numbers but not importance. Online writers and bloggers are increasing in numbers and gaining mind-share.

So, what’s a small production winery to do? Yes… you’ve heard it here before “Do what you can and outsource the rest”. Not to seem too preachy here, but despite the cooperative nature of the wine industry we are all competing for media attention and ultimately to capture the interest and loyalty of consumers both locally and nationally.

Pitching your story likely falls into the realm of outsourcing to professionals that understand how to qualify a writers palate preferences and story interests, know how to pitch an article and already have both traditional and online journalist contacts and developed relationships.

OWB Steps Up

Good things happening at Oregon Wine Board – a new executive director and experienced marketing staff, a cool new mobile website designed by the folks at Lynksnap, lots of exciting plans and 2012 marketing initiatives. Kicking off 2012, check out this first annual consumer event sponsored and produced by OWB:

Taste Oregon, April 29th at the Left Bank Annex in Portland kicks off Oregon Wine Month. The event is intended to showcase the state’s great wines under one room along with delicious food from local chefs. Attendance is expected to be 750-1,000 people. Sign-ups will be taken on a first come first serve basis. Taste Oregon will work to accommodate as many wineries as are interested in participating. Please fill out the linked form and submit it to the Oregon Wine Board by December 30 along with payment.

50 Year History of Oregon Wine

Kudos to Katherine Cole (again)! Even if you don’t need to brush up on the history of Oregon Wine, this Oregonian special article is a great and concise review hitting most high points over the last 50 years: http://topics.oregonlive.com/tag/history/index.html

I found it particularly heartwarming having just seen many of the luminaries Katherine mentions in the article at Salud! this weekend. The pioneers and leaders  in Oregon Wine have a history of taking care of each other and the environment.

Part of the evenings entertainment at the Salud! event was a special video production highlighting the importance of the program. Paraphrasing a quote from a vineyard worker regarding the impact of healthcare for seasonal vineyard workers as provided by the Salud! program: ‘The Salud! program takes care of me and my family; we take special care of the vines’. Nice!

Economic Impact of Wine – Oregonian Article

Hard to believe direct/indirect wine related revenues almost doubled in 5 years. Profitability for small producers certainly hasn’t. What am I missing here? I think percent of total increases due to Direct to C0nsumer is understandable. Byron Dooley’s comments about his strategy and results are a testament. I’m sure we’ll be hearing more about this from all wine corners in Oregon. Here’s the article:

http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2011/07/oregon_wine_industry_nearly_do.html

OWB’s new consumer focus

How refreshing to see new management identifying the importance of ‘Winery to Consumer’ sales. Thank you to The Oregonian for publishing this story on 5/15/2011. In addition to Jeannette Morgan, Oregon Wine Board just hired Charles Humble, the new Director of Marketing and Communications. I was at a recent TRMN meeting at Kelty Estate B&B in Lafayette. Charles had a chance to introduce himself after three days on the job. He discussed the importance of small producers in the Oregon wine industry, and the renewed marketing focus at OWB going forward. I talked to Charles afterward and he said “I’ve died and gone to heaven. Working is one thing, but working in an area where you have great passion is another”. We’re looking forward to great things from both Jeanette and Charles. Here’s the article: http://www.oregonlive.com/wine/index.ssf/2011/05/tech_industry_veteran_jeanette.html

Events Season is here!

May started off with beautiful weather and lots of consumer wine events. In the rush of doing so many things year-round, it’s important for wineries to remember event best practices. Let’s start with the 3 reasons we do onsite and offsite events: Sell wine, Sell club memberships, Secure new emails. Are you comfortable asking consumers to purchase? Let’s be certain your associates are too. How about justifying the wine club commitment? How is yours different? Take ‘the teeth’ out of your wine club applications, and make it easy and fun for consumers to join you. How about securing emails? Are you still using a lined pad? Since real estate on tables provided by events is shrinking (I’m now seeing wineries share 8 foot tables), go to a simple 4”X6” tear off pad format to capture: Names, Email address and “How did you hear about us?”. The last piece of information helps you track back to referral sources and media effectiveness. It also alerts you to what winery stories to tell, and what promotional info to provide your audience when you invite them to visit your tasting room, the ultimate reason we do these events in the first place.

SB 442

I just heard about the bill and think this is a long time coming. I work in the wine industry after-all, and know that 75% of our 400 wineries are small producers. They along with hundreds of vineyard owners employ thousands of Oregonians, most of whom toil in obscurity. This simple long overdue (in my opinion) bill brings some measure of attention and respect to one of our most important industries, and we hope this simple measure helps brand Oregon Wine both to those living here and countless visitors to our fine state. I believe the bill is being presented this week. If this becomes a protracted debate by our representatives, you can voice your support by contacting:

Please email and direct the letter to ibernards@TravelSalem.com

Attention: Angie Morris, President & CEO

Cultivating Communities

181 High St. NE

Salem, OR 97301