Cavalcade of Covid Creativity

New Products and Services for Wineries

I’ve been on the receiving end of several pitches for new products and services from startup companies looking to help promote the wine business and potentially my clients. Why now I’m wondering? It seems that Covid-19 has unleased the creativity, resources and marketing talents of many erstwhile service providers seeking to enter the business. The programs range from river cruises to loyalty credit cards for wine lovers; from wine mapping and appointment apps to virtual tasting programs; consumer shipping and distribution services for small producers, to creative media outlets including new podcasts, mobile apps and Wine TV shows.

If you’re interested in details on any of the above, contact me by email and I’d be happy to share what I’ve learned. Today, I’d like to highlight an interesting online value purchase platform called Wine Insiders. I was contacted by the company and sent wines to review, but for this article I will review the company value proposition and timing for market entry. I will also comment on two of the wines.

Just six months ago, wine shipping lagged other commodities. This is no longer the case. Stay at home orders in most states prompted online wine purchases by consumers that had never purchased wine DTC in the past. As the pandemic carries on and employment lingers, value priced quality wine will continue to attract more buyers. That’s where Wine Insiders comes in. From their press release:

  • #1 transactional marketplace by volume
  • #1 rated wine site in the country with over 3,000 5-star reviews on Google Stores
  • Over 6 million orders from 2 million households across the nation
  • $400 million revenue to date
  • Tech-savvy audience: 47% of revenue comes from mobile devices

Wow, who knew? According to this well-timed press release on March 17th (did they nail pantry-stocking or what?), Wine Insiders is a brand marketing company that has been around for 38 years, and they have launched another remake of their program. If you are interested in wines in the $8-$20 U.S. range, a fan of Wine Insiders’ partner Martha Stewart’s and her fav value wines, or no-charge shipping (6 bottles+), this might be the site for you to explore – https://wineinsiders.com/

My wife and I tasted through the six wines we received. Here are some notes from our two favorites.

2019 Cantina di Solopaca Falanghina, Benvento, Italy. 13% Alc. $22 $17

This white wine is pale yellow to straw colored, very clear and translucent in the glass. Lemon aromas were predominant on the nose with light white flower notes. On the palate, this was a balanced dry wine with nice floral and citrus notes and good acidity. Pair with salad if you like lemon-based dressing.

We would classify this as a “liar” grape in that it opens off-dry, but finishes quite dry. This is a fun wine with mouth-watering acidity which we decided to enjoy with our dinner, a salmon and pesto pasta. We’d buy and recommend.

2019 Fuerza de la Tierra Tempranillo, La Mancha, Spain 13% Alc. $20 $15

This red wine is intensely deep purple, almost opaque and very pretty in color. We couldn’t stop noticing its appearance. We got dark red fruit and pleasant earthy/herbal/vegetal notes on the nose. This is a medium acidity and medium tannin wine that is built for food now, but we feel will benefit from at least 1-2 years in your cellar. We’d call this a “bad boy” Tempranillo, aggressive but with promise, like an adolescent needing time to mature. We like it, recommend, and would buy. Pair with meat, heavy sauces or savory dishes.

For label images of these two reviews, please check my social media sites – Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @CarlGiavanti

Brianne Cohen, Sommspirations

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Brianne Cohen is the principal in a new lifestyle brand and business based out of Los Angeles, California. She has been producing events and weddings for over 10 years. To complement the event and wedding arm of her business, she added her love of wine and also offers her services as a wine educator, writer, and consultant to inspire people of all ages. Most recently Brianne judged at the International Wine & Spirits Competition and the International Wine Challenge in London. Brianne completed the entire curriculum with the Wine & Spirits Education Trust and received her Diploma certificate, which is one of the most coveted and difficult wine certifications. She also holds an MBA from Loyola Marymount University and currently blogs at www.BrianneCohen.com

You can follow Brianne on Facebook, TwitterInstagram and read her stories and reviews on https://briannecohen.com/

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I came to wine, like most, as a hobby. I drank it, I loved it, and I wanted to learn more. In 2013 I started the WSET curriculum and never looked back. By the time I began the WSET Diploma (their flagship certificate and the stepping stone to the MW), I decided to write a blog to document my journey. Little did I know that starting a blog and having a wine voice on social media meant I would start getting samples, invites to wine events and requests to attend press trips! I essentially became a wine writer and didn’t even know it. At first it was all fun and games as my focus was the Diploma program and passing each of those grueling tests. Once I got my coveted PASS certificate, I realized that I had a voice, a platform, and a heck of a lot of knowledge about wine that I wanted to share with others.

What are your primary story interests?

I like to write about things that everyday wine consumers might find interesting. In my writing (on my blog, in publications, and on my social media platforms) my goal is to help you DRINK BETTER and Up Your Wine Game. This includes answering basic wine questions, offering up wine country itineraries, and reviewing wines that I would recommend to people who enjoy wine.

What are your primary palate preferences?

I consider myself a generalist when it comes to wine. When you study wine for 5+ years, you train yourself to be a student. Never try to same thing twice and be open to new things. If I was studying sparkling wine, that was my favorite. If I was studying fortifieds, that was my favorite. Now that I am no longer “officially” studying, I can’t seem to shake that mentality. I always want to try new things. I don’t generally stick to classic regions or even classic producers. Every time I drink I want a new experience. With that being said, sparkling wine has a special place in my heart.

Is it possible to make a living as a wine writer today? If so, how have you succeeded? If not, why not? What are the primary challenges and hurdles you face?

I am not trying to make a living as a wine writer, so I cannot give a firsthand opinion. BUT about two years ago when I was really looking at my life and my business, I reached out to a handful of wine personalities and asked their opinions. Not one of them said that you can survive on a wine writer’s salary. That was a thing of the past. So, I’d venture to say NO. Early in my blogging years I heard something that still resonates with me to this day: you cannot make money on a blog. You make money by harnessing your skillset and knowledge. That is what you can sell and make money from. That is how education became my focus. I wanted to set myself apart from the wine personalities who were just that personalities, but without much substance. I started actively pitching in October of last year. Within a month I had secured my first writing gig (unpaid) in a digital wine publication. I am also proud to announce that I have secured my first PAID writing gig for a print publication! The challenge in being self-employed is to allocate your time. If 5% of my income comes from writing, I shouldn’t spend more than about 10% of my time writing. 5% to ensure I secure that income. The rest of my writing (on my own blog and on social media) I consider a marketing exercise. That is how I tell people who I am, what I do, and how they can hire me.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

People are surprised that I speak Spanish. My father was born and raised in Argentina and I identify closely with Argentina and their culture. My husband and I even tango dance!

What haven’t you done, that you’d like to do?

I am addicted to travel. I’d love to spend a year traveling the globe or go on a world cruise.

What’s the best story you have written? Please provide a link.

I am very proud of this story about Oregon Gamay. I attended a wine writers conference in August of 2019 (I was unpublished at that point). I set a goal to be published by the end of 2019. Sent this pitch in and BOOM, this piece was published on November 17, 2019. Link HERE.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

My approach to wine writing is to keep it clear, simple, and understandable. The more wine education we obtain, the less approachable our writing becomes. I see it all of the time, and have even seen it in my writing. I am now very conscious of this and always try to remember who my reader is. Someone who loves wine, loves to drink it, and perhaps wants to know a bit more. Not a lot more. Once you get technical and start talking about soils and what not, you have lost most people.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up?

YES. I’d be lost without my editorial schedule. I tend to post on my blog about once a week. I use Trello (a free project management platform) to list and organize story ideas. Monthly I look at those lists and prioritize my writing for the month ahead.

Do you post your articles on social media? Why is that important? 

Yes, I 100% post my articles on social media. Social media is the #1 way I send people to my website and my blog. Social media is important to me and my business because it allows me to have a consistent voice. I also use my social media platforms to answer wine questions for my audience, which is complementary to my services as a wine educator. I have booked wine classes directly from social media. I’ll say it again. I have actually made income and gotten new clients from connections I have made on social media. Aside from a direct referral, social media is my #1 marketing tool.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

There is no such thing as TOO much information. Journalists want the background stories, how you got started, tech sheets on wines tasted, retail pricing (!!!), photos, etc.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

They understand ALL Of the above.

Which wine reviewers/critics would you most like to be on a competition panel with?

I‘m sure I’m not the first person to say this: Jancis Robinson. She wrote the book….literally wrote THE book. I’d love to hear how her brain works in a competitive tasting. Sidebar: while judging at the International Wine Challenge (IWC) in London, our judging panel hit a wall and could not get a consensus on a wine. A senior judge was called over to our table to help, and it was none other than Oz Clarke. I don’t think I contributed anything the entire time (which was only 2 minutes!) he was tasting with us. Totally frozen….wine celebrity status. I came to after he walked away and I thought “did I just taste (in a wine competition) with Oz Clarke?!?!?!?

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

YES! All the time. I am not one of those entrepreneurs who works nonstop and burns the candle at both ends. I set clear boundaries and always work hard to maintain a work/life balance. In my time off, I enjoy traveling, yoga at Hyperslow (my fav studio in LA), reading, and cooking. All of those things recharge me. I feel the most alive when I am doing those things.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

I recently attended the Wine Media Conference in the Hunter Valley of Australia. One of the excursions I attended was to Tyrrell’s where the group enjoyed a vertical of their Vat 1 Semillon. Chris Tyrrell (6th generation, I believe) guided us through those wines. It was an experience to be remembered.

What’s your favorite wine regions in the world?

I don’t have a favorite at all because I strive to always try wines from everywhere. As a general rule I try to never have the same wine twice. There is SO much wine to enjoy in this world! The wine region I am most excited about is Valle de Guadalupe in Baja California, Mexico. As I explain it to people, imagine the Mexican culture, hospitality, and vibe that we all know and love. Now drop that into a wine region. I find VdG SO exciting and I cannot wait to see how this region grows and evolves. For those who doubt Mexican wines or Mexico’s ability to anchor a wine region, I give you two facts that might change your mind. #1 There are Mexican wines carried at French Laundry (a Nebbiolo from Vinos Lechuza). #2 American chef Drew Deckman (Michelin star and all!) left the US and has been chefin’ it up in VdG for over 10 years. Come for the food, stay for the wine, and you won’t be disappointed. The spirit here is one of excitement and experimentation…..and I LOVE sharing it with people!

Can you speak to the timely (and overdue) conversations around representation, diversity, and inclusion in wine?

We women have demanded and (sometimes) received seats at many wine tables, which is fantastic. But it can always get better and I try to embody that as much as possible and speak up when I see a lack of diversity. This was quite evident in my wine judging experiences this past year. Without beating around the bush, these rooms were the whitest rooms I have ever been in. I can’t help but wonder about these non-diverse judging spaces I’ve been in. I think of the medals we award and how some of those wines will have collar tags or shelf talkers next to their bottles in wine shops touting their gold or silver medals along with our tasting notes. If a person of color is looking at those accolades, what does that mean for them if people who look like them were not involved with this whole process? Are these awards relevant in our diverse, multi-cultural world if diversity was not in the room to judge them in the first place? Or, better yet, how can we all advocate for representation, diversity, and inclusion in all wine spaces.  I’m thinking about writing a blog piece about this topic.

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 12th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Dorothy J. Gaiter & John Brecher, Wine Journalists and Authors

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Dorothy J. Gaiter and John Brecher conceived and wrote The Wall Street Journal’s weekly wine column, “Tastings,” from 1998 to 2010. They are currently senior editors at Grape Collective (grapecollective.com). They are also the authors of four books on wine and appeared regularly on TV (from Martha Stewart to “Today) and radio, including “Fresh Air.” They met and fell in love at The Miami Herald on their first day out of college on June 4, 1973. Dottie has worked at The Herald, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. John has worked at The Herald, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg News. Their papers were recently added to the Warren Winiarski Wine Writers Collection at the University of California at Davis, along with those of Hugh Johnson, Jancis Robinson, Karen MacNeil and others. They invented the international celebration of wine, love and friendship called “Open That Bottle Night.”

You can follow Dorothy & John on FacebookInstagram and Twitter, and read their stories and reviews on Grape Collective Magazine.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

It was an accident. When The Wall Street Journal began Weekend Journal in 1998, the editor, who knew about our passion for wine, asked if we’d volunteer a wine column in addition to our real jobs. John was Page One Editor and Dottie was Editor for Urban Affairs. We had been enjoying and studying wine together for 35 years, but had never written about it and didn’t plan to. But the editor was a friend so we said sure. We had no idea the column would take off as it did. Two years later, we went to the brilliant Managing Editor of The Journal, Paul Steiger, and told him we couldn’t do both wine and our real jobs anymore. He asked which we’d rather do. That’s when we became full-time wine writers.

What are your primary story interests?

We like to write columns that have a story behind them. So many wines, wine regions and winemakers have interesting stories. We like to tell those stories.

What are your primary palate preferences?

We will try anything. At an event for home winemakers in Miami years ago, we tried a couple of garlic wines. One, a sparkler, was fascinating and we suspected it was a ringer. The other, a still wine, was not very tasty, but, as you can tell, we never forgot it. It had very strong hints of – well, garlic.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

When Dottie was a reporter at The New York Times, she wrote a story about thousands of elderly New Yorkers going without food on weekends because the program that fed them didn’t cover them on those days. Gael Greene read the story, called her friend James Beard and founded Citymeals on Wheels, which has now delivered more than 60 million meals. The organization honored Dottie a couple of years ago. John was the most successful Page One Editor of The Wall Street Journal (this is from his boss). The Journal won seven Pulitzer Prizes for stories he oversaw, including three straight National Pulitzers and the only two Feature Pulitzers it has ever won.

What haven’t you done, that you’d like to do?

Visit South Africa.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your writing about wine?

Wine can make life more enjoyable. It makes you slow down and when you do, you can appreciate everyone around you – especially your loved ones – a little bit more.

What’s the best story you have written? Please provide a link.

We are best-known for our invention of Open That Bottle Night, the worldwide celebration of wine, friendship and love. The Journal nominated our first Open That Bottle Night follow-up column for a Pulitzer. Here is the link to this year’s follow-up story: https://grapecollective.com/articles/phelps-insignia-jackass-zin-and-a-vice-bust-how-the-world-celebrated-otbn

If you weren’t writing about wine for a living, what would you be doing?  

We’d be working on hard news.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

We like to say that we have never written a wine column. We write a column about life, love, family and getting by every day. We use wine as our central theme to talk about those really important topics.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up

Ideally, we prefer stories to come up organically as we enjoy wine in our real lives. Sometimes they are wines we’ve bought, sometimes samples sent to us. But, of course, the calendar is important. People do want to know about bubblies for the holidays and rosé in summer and romance around Valentine’s Day. In 2019, we interviewed Heidi and Bo Barrett for Valentine’s and this year Mary Ewing-Mulligan and Ed McCarthy.

Do you post your articles on social media? Why is that important?

We are on Instagram as @dottieandjohn, Twitter as @winecouple and Facebook as facebook.com/winecouple – and, of course, at grapecollective.com. More and more people get their information on social media. It’s an important part of communication today.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

Be responsive! When we contact you with questions, please get back to us with the information we need. That may be obvious, but, man, you’d be surprised.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

When it’s something like, say, photographs or spec sheets, good publicists can make things easier for everyone. We interview winemakers directly. Sometimes publicists can help us get their attention.

What frustrates you most about working on winery stories and/or wine reviews?

We’re glad you asked. It is annoying when we write about a wine – either on social media or at Grape Collective – and later a publicist contacts us and asks, “So what did you think of the wine?” It seems to us that one of the things wineries are paying publicists for is to know when they are written about so they can disseminate kind words across their own social networks. Use Google Alerts or other tools. It’s good for wineries and it’s good for us when publicists and their clients see our work and spread it widely. And it’s insulting when publicists don’t bother to read our work.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

Maybe three or four times a year, when we go out, we will have real drinks – a martini for John and a whisky sour for Dottie. We rarely have real drinks and don’t know anything about spirits. Since we’re not having wine, we don’t geek out about the beverage in front of us. It’s like a night off.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

One of the wines that made Napa famous was the Beaulieu Vineyard Georges de Latour 1968 Cabernet Sauvignon, crafted by the great André Tchelistcheff. When we honeymooned in Napa in 1979, Beaulieu was still selling that wine in the tasting room. We bought a bottle, borrowed a couple of glasses and drank it amid the vines. We have often said it was the greatest wine we have ever had or will ever have.

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

We will always have a soft spot for Napa. We first visited in 1975 – the first time we’d been to a wine region – and honeymooned there in 1979. We’ve been back many times since. It holds many memories for us.

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 12th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Covid’s Winery Wake Up Call

It’s About Marketing, Not Winemaking

Hear me out. I know winemaking is important, but the wine sales game has changed dramatically. Covid-19 tasting room closures have proven this. See the preceding article written at the beginning of tasting room closures back in March, 2020 – Covid, Community & Commerce.

If you doubt the premise of this follow-up article, there are several things I would ask you to consider:

  • The Covid-19 pandemic proves that the survival of your business is not predicated on making premium quality wine, but rather, marketing and selling wine in new and creative ways
  • Competing on limited production quality wine is no longer the point of difference is was 25 years ago. Wine production expertise, regional experience and enology technical advancements have leveled the playing field globally.
  • The Tasting Room model of the last 20 years is antiquated and over-subscribed
  • Large distributors will continue the consolidation of shelf space and retail presence
  • “Branded” wineries with marketing strategies, staffing and budgets are competing with family owned wineries who have real characters and stories behind their products
  • “Celebrity” wineries with funding and influence are competing and have real people behind the brands (Cameron Diaz, Kate Upton, John Malcovic, Bon Jovi, C.J. McCollum). The list goes on…
  • Professional online wine marketing organizations will sell more wine than you can in your tasting room and to your wine club, even if the quality is not equivalent
  • Providing personalized experiences is how to compete with branded and corporate wineries

Stop thinking you are in the winery production business, and start believing you are in the wine marketing business. Your competitive advantage is that consumers are supporting authentic brands that resonate with them. You are real characters. Characters with great wine and stories to engage consumers. The Branded marketing companies can’t compete with that, and you can’t compete with them unless you have a significant digital presence and online marketing strategy, even though the quality of your wine is superior.

If you are a small producer, let’s concede that financial resources are limited, and really you can’t compete with well-funded marketers. However, you can provide something they can’t – an emotional connection with your brand – by delivering exceptional personal experiences, albeit at a value-added price points. Rather, turn your focus to doing a better job marketing and selling than everyone else in your own space. This may seem counter to the collaborations small producers have established in their regions, and with the support of regional and AVA associations, but at the end of the day we’re talking about competing and survival, in business. Find an elegant and egalitarian way to do it.

In fact, to take this one step further, your tasting room is no longer the only key to your consumer direct business. Your website is, and your target market is expanding beyond those that can visit you in person. Imagine if all businesses were limited to selling product to customers onsite and in person. It’s not a business model that still makes sense. Create a sales strategy as if you were an “online only” wine business with no brick and mortar. I would urge you to do three things:

  1. Identify and profile your ideal customer. Create similar audiences and target market to them, and request introductions to their like-interested friends
  2. Look at your online stats by using website analytics to segment and target your online marketing
  3. Continue your virtual wine events to capture and expand new out of state audiences, and support club members who live outside your region. There is a largely untapped opportunity to expand online revenues, grow followers and use contemporary technologies that consumers embrace

Having an onsite tasting room is a bonus, but don’t rely on visits and club signups only. How can you convey that in-person experience and share your unique brand stories online? I think this will be our biggest challenge. The answer is about marketing. Actually, it always has been.

Note: This article originally ran on July 20th, 2020 as an Expert Editorial by Wine Industry Network: https://wineindustryadvisor.com/2020/07/20/covids-winery-wake-up-call

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 12th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Randy Smith, The Wine Write

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Randy Smith is the man behind The Wine Write. Randy grew up in the Mississippi Delta many years ago with not a vineyard in sight. After wasting a lot of time, he caught the wine bug after taking a wine appreciation course at a community college. A lot of wine tasting and wine travel ensued. Randy started The Wine Write website and blog in 2011. There he posts weekly stories about winemakers and other wine people that capture his interest.

You can follow Randy on Facebook and Twitter, and read his stories and reviews on The Wine Write.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I was introduced to wine later in life than most via a community college wine appreciation course. I was bitten by the wine bug there and soon started planning wine trips to California, Oregon, Washington, and New York. We’ve continued to travel for wine several times each year. I was nudged into writing about wine by my wife. I enjoyed wine and creative writing, so it’s been a good outlet for me. At the time I started The Wine Write I was unaware that blogs even existed.

What are your primary story interests?

I focus on the personalities behind the labels, so I primarily interview winemakers and other people in wine. I find it fascinating to learn about how they got connected to wine, who influenced them, and how they got to where they are in the business.

What are your primary palate preferences?

I like Syrah, Grenache, Riesling, Chardonnay, Mourvedre, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Grenache Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Gruner Veltliner, Cabernet Franc, Petite Sirah, Roussanne, Albarino, Merlot, Petit Verdot, and Nebbiolo. Among other varietals. And blends.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you?

When I’m interviewing someone the first question I’m often asked is, “Where are you from?” I’m pretty sure my accent causes some consternation…a lot of people think I’m from Paso Robles or the Central Coast because I’ve interviewed a number of people from there. Actually, I was born in the Mississippi Delta and now live just outside New Orleans. Not a lot of vineyards around here.

What is probably also surprising is that I have no vocational background in wine or in professional writing. I worked in the insurance business four decades. Most of my writing there was centered around medical malpractice claims. Not nearly as creative or as fun as wine.

What haven’t you done, that you’d like to do?

There are so many more wine people out there that I’d love to interview. I keep grinding away. I’m still not done with wine travel, either!

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your writing about wine?

There are a lot of small producers making excellent wines and most of the people behind those brands are really nice folks.

What’s the best story you have written?

I don’t know if it’s the best story I’ve ever written, but as I was talking to Richard Sanford I was thinking, “Holy shit, I’m having a conversation with Richard Sanford.” He’s a Hall of Fame vintner and one of the nicest guys on the planet. I felt so privileged to chat with him.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I try to read everything I can find about my interview subjects. I then develop a list of ten to twelve questions for them. I try to ask questions that I haven’t seen covered in the articles I came across doing my research. During the actual interview the direction may change based on what I hear from my subject. After doing the interview I try as best as I can to put everything together in an interesting fashion. I do a lot of rereads.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up?

I have no schedule. I’m retired from my working life and The Wine Write for fun.

How often do you blog?

I blog weekly and post the stories each Sunday night.

Do you post your articles on social media? Why is that important?

I do post on social media to spread the word. I am on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Surprisingly to me I also get good response to sharing my posts on LinkedIn.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

Mutual respect is the key to most working relationships. I am most appreciative of the time that winery people give me. I would hope that my time and work is also appreciated. I have to say that I’ve rarely run into any issues with wineries.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

Working with a publicist makes the scheduling of interviews much easier. Background material is usually provided by publicists, so that reduces the amount of online sleuthing I have to do. That being said, the overwhelming majority of my work has been done without the involvement of publicists.

Which wine personalities would you most like to meet and taste with (living or dead)?

M.F.K. Fisher. I love her books and essays. She was a pioneering food and wine writer who was so far ahead of her time.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them?

Every day is now a day off. When I’m not writing or traveling, I may be watching grandchildren, surfing the internet, or reading. From April through September I’m also managing my fantasy baseball team.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

There have been a lot of them, but spending time with Richard Sanford in El Jabali Vineyard and touring Smith-Madrone Vineyard with Stuart Smith have to rank high among them.

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 12th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Amy Glynn, Poet, Essayist, Wine Writer

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Amy Glynn is an award-winning poet and essayist whose work appears widely in journals and anthologies including The Best American Poetry. She has written about wine (and other things) for Paste Magazine since 2013. Amy currently serves as poet laureate for the cities of Orinda and Lafayette CA.

You can follow Amy on Facebook and Twitter, and read her stories and reviews on Paste Magazine.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

Through poetry. I’m a literary writer by training, and wine is essentially metaphor in a bottle. As it turns out I have a good palate, so the leap was pretty obvious.

What are your primary story interests?

I am a natural history nerd, so I like getting into deep detail about different varietals’ histories, where they come from, why they’ve traveled (or not), who first cultivated them, that kind of thing. I enjoy demystifying wine and bringing under-recognized regions, techniques or grapes into clearer focus. I don’t especially care about “trends” or cults of personality. I love everything else.

Are you a staff columnist or freelance? What are the advantages of both?

I’ve been both. I started writing freelance for Paste Magazine in 2013, and in 2015 they made me a full-time staff writer reporting to drink, film and tv sections (yes, wine and TV. It’s as glamorous as it sounds). Recently my outlet decided full-time staff writers were a drain on the bottom line and now I am again freelancing.

Advantages of both? Honestly, I cannot say this loudly enough: Freelancing bites. As a staff writer I didn’t make a particularly fabulous salary but I had a salary, which enabled me to be much more open, expansive, and reactive to inbound pitches than I am able to be when every piece I file has to be OK’ed in advance and accounted for in a piecework budget. Articles I pour huge amounts of energy into fetch $100 (sometimes less) before taxes. It would take over 150 such articles just to pay CA property taxes on a modest home, so do the math. Add to this, no healthcare, no expectation of even notional stability, no consistent community or sense of making a valued contribution. There might be some type of writer for whom freelancing is the better option but I cannot imagine it. It is flat-out impossible to do your best work under those circumstances.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

I’m a great jazz singer. Seriously.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your writing about wine?

All kinds of things, but much of it boils down to this: That while it is almost infinitely complicated in some ways, wine is just not hard to understand or appreciate. It doesn’t require gnostic initiation, special training, a degree, or any rarefied skill set. You’ll get a more nuanced appreciation of it with some study, to be sure, but no one has to – you can just drink it and like what you like without justification. It’s a lot like poetry that way too.

If you weren’t writing about wine for a living, what would you be doing?  

“For a living.” You’re hilarious.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I’m not sure I have one unified approach, but it starts with the wine itself. I get a lot of pitches from publicists about corporate collaborations and celebrity endorsements and kitschy packaging and I am slightly baffled by the idea that there are people for whom those things matter. Maybe most often I get introduced to a producer or a region I’m not that familiar with and something just clicks. Once I personally want to know more, it’s an easy leap to think perhaps other people do too.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up?

Both.

Do you consider yourself an Influencer? What’s the difference today between a writer and an influencer in your opinion?

As a peak brat-pack Gen X-er, I consider “influencer” to be code for a kind of content (and a kind of human, in some cases) that’s exactly how I wouldn’t want to be thought of. I am absolutely not an influencer. I’m a writer. Good writers should be influential and occasionally we are, but my goal isn’t to influence anyone, it’s to communicate, and hopefully to provoke curiosity and increase knowledge and understanding in some way.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

The big one: Think twice about pitching a writer whose work you have not bothered to read. And if you do it anyway and they don’t respond? They are passing on your pitch. No need to continue asking. We get dozens, scores, in some cases hundreds of these emails a week. If we’re interested, believe me, you’ll know. And once we have a relationship it’s absolutely no problem to check in; this applies to cold leads.

Please be direct, honest, even blunt about what you are hoping for and how you think I can help you. The more I understand about where someone is coming from beyond the vicissitude-rife notion of “visibility” the more I can collaborate. I’ve been invited on costly press trips where the reality is, that region’s wines are not being made commercially available to my readers. (For a travel writer that might not be as much of an issue but in my case, the relevance goes way down once I’m talking about something no one in the US will be able to find.) Even being direct about your awkwardly-political constraints is helpful. Not long ago I was kind of upbraided and asked to delete a social media post because I had hashtagged a word the rep associated with a rival DOC. The word also had a common-parlance meaning so I was kind of perplexed (and to be honest, irritated; see above re: we do not work for you). Had the rep candidly shared with me what the underlying issue was, I would probably have been all too happy to accommodate it, but instead there was a pointlessly high-friction exchange that made dinner uncomfortable that night. The truth is your friend.

Happily, I don’t deal with this all the time, but… Sometimes I wish producers and their reps would bear in mind that I do not work for them. Sometimes when people send costly samples or invite writers to swanky events or shower us with swag (which we usually love, don’t get me wrong) they seem to develop the understandable but incorrect sense that they have in some subtle way paid for an advertorial. It doesn’t, shouldn’t and cannot work that way, and it’s very difficult to navigate when that happens.

Winemakers are passionate about what they do. They want everyone to love what they do as well –who doesn’t? When something is a labor of love it is painful when it goes unacknowledged. But sometimes I get more samples than I can quickly process, or your wine wasn’t to my personal taste and I would rather not be pressed about it, or I am working for an outlet that isn’t receptive or is behind on the calendar or whose needs have abruptly shifted… for any number of reasons you might not get what you want out of me. Probably I feel bad about that already, so treading lightly is appreciated.

Can you explain why samples sent by wineries sometimes don’t get reviewed?

I have received samples of a great many good wines I have not yet featured, and the reasons range from “for some esoteric reason it didn’t feel like it fit in this roundup” to “really similar to something else on this list” to “my bad, I forgot to include that one” to “I did include it and the editor trimmed the piece, and did so arbitrarily” to “no freaking reason on earth.” “I don’t love this wine” does come up as well, and in that case I assume you’d prefer me to quietly pass versus give your baby a negative review.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

Good publicists can make a writer’s life sooo much easier in so many ways, providing insights and access to products I might not know about (or might not be able to afford on my own), facilitating the flow of information and providing context. A rep who is honest and candid and paying attention is an invaluable asset.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

I have kids, so spending time with them is a priority. When money allows I love to travel, I love theater and live music, and in the past I’ve had some unforgettable experiences at writers’ conferences. I garden a lot, and I enjoy entertaining­–having a group of friends wander over on a weekend afternoon to hang out in the backyard, cook and open some nice bottles? That’s an entirely satisfactory way to spend a day off. In reality, my “down” time is also what I have available to do my non-commercial writing, so that ends up getting privileged quite often.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

Hard to narrow down. The first time I read Randall Grahm’s tasting notes at Bonny Doon was eye-opening. Tasting a flight of Gary Farrell Pinots with Teresa Heredia was likewise. The first orange wine I ever tasted (late bloomer) was a revelation (it was Donkey and Goat’s skin-contact Roussanne, “Stonecrusher”). But as a whole experience, maybe it’s this:

It’s 5pm, and four of us have rolled into San Gimignano in the unfortunate position of having skipped lunch. We are starving. Loath to be the American tourists looking for dinner at 5, but starving. Finally we find a place that’s open and get a table on the sidewalk, and proceed to order a bottle of local Supertuscan while we devour some painfully unsalted bread. An old man is watching us while he smokes a cigarette, one bootheel up on the wall he’s leaning against. He watches us as the server pours the wine, no doubt sneering inwardly at our gauche ways. The wine’s delicious and everyone launches into an animated discussion of its virtues. The old man stubs out the cigarette and approaches. “You like the wine?” he asks with an impenetrable Tuscan accent. We do! It’s fabulous. “I make the wine,” he says. “Ah, you make wine?” “I make this wine,” he said, and we all had a crazy linguistically challenged discussion of its characteristics. It was such an only-in-Italy moment, but also, there I was assuming the dude was laughing at us for being rubes when he was actually dying to know if we thought his Sangiovese was worth buying. It was great to get that reminder.

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

I’m not sure I can narrow to one region, but the one-word answer is “Italy.”

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Howard Hewitt, Newspaper Editor/Writer

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Howard Hewitt is a retired writer, marketer, and digital marketing professional located in Indianapolis, In. He now works part time in retail wine sales. Howard spent 22 years in the newspaper industry and capped his career as a suburban editor for the Indianapolis Star. He wrote an every-other-week column from the fall of 2007 to October of 2018. He still writes occasional features for his more-than-20 newspapers and a few specialty publications. He is active on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. His site is: www.howardhewitt.net

You can follow Howard on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter, and read his stories and reviews at www.howardhewitt.net.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I developed an interest in wine in the 1990s. We all start innocently enough. For me, it was Riunite when I made a little pasta. From their I graduated to Rieslings – and thought the Germans were way better than everyone else. Who knew I had an aptitude for vino?

I came to writing as a career choice. Though I spent most of my career as a newspaper editor, I was writing the entire 22 professional years and beyond. I worked at small town newspapers as a reporter, writer, editor, and a short stint as a publisher. I continued to write for 14 years before retiring in late 2016, then working in the marketing  departments of Wabash College and Purdue University.

What are your primary story interests?

I most enjoy the story about the people in the wine industry. Let’s face it, wine is made largely through the same process but no two winemakers are alike. Sure, there are twists and different techniques in wine making but people that make decisions to try something different hold the most interest for me.

Is it possible to make a living as a wine writer today? If so, how have you succeeded? If not, why not? What are the primary challenges and hurdles you face?

No, no, … just not enough paying opportunities – and it was never a goal.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

For quite a few years I was a B-level competitive racquetball player. I also rode Century (100 mile) bike rides in the early 1990s.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your writing about wine?

I would hope that readers would pick up on the sense of adventure in wine. There is always something new to try or a twist on an old favorite. I have always tried to educate too, about visiting wine country anywhere in the world and how to make the most of your trip.

If you weren’t writing about wine for a living, what would you be doing?

Features on interesting people.

What’s the best story you have written? Please provide a link.

Not sure about best – I have several I really liked. This is one of those:

https://howardhewitt.net/2016/03/27/olivers-pinot-a-statement-wine/

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I hardly ever do wine reviews any more other than Vivino, the phone app. I’m just not sure another opinion is needed in all of the fog of ratings and such. I use Vivino because that’s for the geeky people anyway. And since I now work a bit part-time in retail wine, I do get asked often about my wine preferences.

My approach to writing is probably different than many as a career journalist. I want the wine sources to tell the story as much, or preferably, more than me. When I started writing in 2007, I thought there was way too much first person in wine writing. The writing then was way too much about what the author thought and not nearly enough from winemakers or winery owners.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up?

Every other week schedule when I was doing column. As they come up now.

Do you post your articles on social media? Why is that important?

I have posted to social media for years. It draws attention to my work. I honestly believe blogs are quickly becoming a thing of the past. I might have 100 or more view a blog post, but I have nearly 2,000 friends on Facebook.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

Accessibility is always a key issue. May I talk to the winemaker? Is the owner available for a brief chat? The more authoritative people the winery can offer a writer the better they are going to like the final result.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

I think it is mainly an advantage. The publicist not only can get the necessary access but help ‘coach up’ the winery spokesperson on how to best take advantage of a good marketing/PR opportunity. At the same time the publicist can help guide the journalists with a few questions or areas of interest to the interview subject. The publicist can also manage a winery’s expectations.

Conversely, the publicist works for the winery. The best men and women in the field maintain an important distance to the process so the writer doesn’t feel he or she is being used strictly to market a bottle or two.

What frustrates you most about working on winery stories and/or wine reviews?

Does anyone really care about my opinion (when writing reviews)?

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

In recent years my time off has often been related to wine. I took a group to Burgundy in 2016, a smaller group to Oregon in the fall of 2016 and did a short visit to Oregon in the fall of 2018. I love going to wine-producing regions but think in 2019 I’d like to take the time to better appreciate the history and culture of those regions – beyond wine.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

That’s a tough one because I’ve been fortunate. Near the top would be a fall press trip to Chablis. Not only did our small group have access to winemakers, but we were there for the annual fall festival. We were able to take part in the multi-part formal dinner with lots and lots of Chablis. The locals named the four of us from the US. Chabliesiennes.

Pick one red and one white to drink for the next month with every dinner

Pinot Noir and White Burgundy

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

Oregon

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Winery Photography – Why it’s SO Important!

Note: this is the full length article. A shorter version of this ran on April 1st in Oregon Wine Press: https://www.oregonwinepress.com/the-bigger-picture

Professional photography can be expensive – anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars – which explains why a client of mine recently balked at the suggestion they hire a professional photographer and build a multi-purpose photo gallery. “iPhone photos are good quality, why can’t we just use those? Are photos so important? Do people really care?” They are, and they do, I offered.

Image based marketing is important because people are reading less. Photos with captions and Instagram posts have taken the place of winery blogs. Newsletters with real winery news are replaced with fast facts and images of events and wine promos.

When working with the media, know that writers prefer to focus on their written interviews and appreciate knowing that the winery has invested in high resolution photography, as their editors typically require photos with proper attribution. Most Online publications do not have photographers on staff and often rely on writers to take or source photos, while Print publications will request high-res large file size images to run with articles.

I talked to Jason Kaplan of Jason E Kaplan Photography about the importance of high-resolution quality photography for wineries. “Wineries can build their brands through storytelling. Images are so important to creating narratives that create an emotional connection to the business. This could be especially true for properties that host events. Even for ones that don’t, people like the opportunity to look behind the curtain and see how things are actually done.” Well said.

I also wanted perspective from a designer and developer, so I asked Shery Rice of Greenhouse for comments. “Consumers don’t always recognize when they are seeing a great photograph. But they know instinctively when they are seeing a bad one—they cannot personally connect with the image and are not inspired to further interaction. The production value of your photography makes a subliminal statement to consumers about how you value your own offerings and leads them to the next unconscious steps in assessing whether or not to pursue your brand further.”

For the reasons stated above, I suggest the following. Photos should be high resolution, and formatted for print, website, and Instagram/social media.

  1. Photo Gallery on the Website – add this page to Main Menu or in the Website Footer. You can use these categories or folders to organize – Seasons, Harvest, Crush, Vineyard, Aerial photos, Winery, Tasting Room, People, Events, Club, Winemaker dinners, etc.
  2. Photo Gallery on the website Trade & Media page – same as #1, or use an anchor link to #1
  3. Dropbox – share link to winery approved photos for use by qualified media – all of the above plus logos, bottle shots*, label images, shelf talkers, headshots and other winery assets

Someone should be assigned to curate this Photo Library which includes items #1, #2 and #3. Marketing will draw from these winery images (owned media) for email newsletters, social media posts, event listings, advertising, print collateral, and the list goes on.

If you decide to work with a photographer, be sure to obtain the original high-resolution image files for print collateral such as logos and labels. The highest resolution are vector files which are completely expandable to any size. Image files in a .TIFF format are also very high resolution and ideal for enlarging an image, and .JPG or .JPEG work well for websites and social media.

Photo resolution and file size are very important, and they vary depending on whether you will be printing, enlarging, using on website or posting on Instagram and social media. Be sure to ask a professional photographer for guidance. I suggest you ask for images in three sizes – print, website and social media. Also ask if image size, aspect ratio and color space can be adjusted and if there are additional fees.

It’s also important to have the rights to your own photos, so attribution goes to your winery instead of to a photographer. This is something you would need to discuss and would only happen for paid engagements. It is less likely that a professional photographer will give you rights if they are doing a pro bono shoot or trading their time for wine. It is also a lot safer to own your own image media than using other people’s social media post images, even though they exist in the public domain.

*Note: Bottle shots are a specialty shoot and should be done by a professional in a studio. I prefer transparent background. I also like vintages removed using Photoshop, which makes the bottle images reusable. Evergreen photography is good.

This article originally appeared in Oregon Wine Press, the April print and digital editions: https://www.oregonwinepress.com/the-bigger-picture

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s enjoyed 11 years of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations and communications consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

 

 

 

Covid, Community & Commerce

The emergence of online engagement and eCommerce 

Many wineries, business partners and consumers are at home in some form of quarantine or under stay at home restrictions. This is a communications opportunity – to interact with other tasting room and wine industry professionals on social media – as well as with your customers, and not just to sell wine. Consumers will want to know what’s going on with the winery, and may be interested in engaging with you online. DTC marketing outreach by old school mail, email and social media will keep people informed and updated, as well as offer them online opportunities to enjoy your wines shipped direct to their homes.

Be authentic and genuine. What is Your Brand really all about? I’m reading that people don’t want more pitches for wine, but want to know what the winery is doing to accommodate followers and community during the crisis. I would hedge a little on promos, and err on the side of subtlety and indirect offers, by focusing on wine education and entertainment experiences which are brand appropriate.

Is this the long-awaited inflection point to meaningful winery eCommerce? Now is the time for wineries to find creative ways to shift their business models and shift their sales channel strategies. The last 10 years saw an adjustment from reliance on distribution sales to selling Consumer Direct. Small producers with fully established DTC programs are the most affected by this disruption and many are reacting very quickly and creatively with online solutions. I think this will be the point of transition for those wineries that have not fully embraced eCommerce, to establish online sales as a significant and ongoing part of their DTC programs.

In addition to curbside pickup and drop-off services, there has been lots of interest and many calls for Virtual Tastings from the winery associations and the media. They are looking for events that are part of your programming, so scheduling and publishing well in advance – to allow for system testing (Facebook Live, Instagram Live, Zoom, Skype, etc.) and presentation practice is important, as well as providing ample time for shipping if customers are interested in acquiring specific wines for the event. From my perspective, this could and should become part of your ongoing DTC program – post pandemic – to reach out-of-state and other targeted groups, i.e. consumers, out of state club members, trade or media – so why not get a program in place now and take a leadership position?

I also suggest you do the math and focus on “Shipping Included” promotions versus discounts. Develop a progressive schedule of different packages and gift packs for instance. Consider which wines to offer for virtual tasting events featuring winemaker and staff. You might be surprised at people’s willingness to meet and taste with you online – with either your wines or for wine education. Finally, remember the phone? I know its old school, but the human voice is reassuring. Keep your staff engaged by having them contact your best customers, not just club members. Check to see how they are doing, let them know what’s happening at the winery – and just this one time – don’t ask or mention selling them wine. You might be surprised at the results.

Here are some best practice marketing articles I’ve read that you may find helpful:

For my part as a publicist, I’m focused on shipping wines to reviewers across the U.S., not only the large national publications but also critics and writers whose opinion matters. Their reports and reviews will help my clients stay top of mind and provide important content to support their marketing efforts. I’ll also reschedule canceled March and April visits, and hopefully start booking media tours again late spring, early summer. That’s my best guess timing at this point. Of course, pitching client stories to national and regional outlets including magazines, broadcast and radio seemingly never ends.

Things that wineries can do on the digital and marketing side are:

  • Website – update all pages with current information, virtual offers and photos. Position the site as if you are an online only business, with tasting room and in person experiences coming soon. Special focus now should be on the shopping cart and mobile shopping experience. Is the site fully responsive? If not fix that. What shipping or “quarantine” promos can you run to capture online sales?
  • Photo Gallery – setup or update your gallery by category (Seasons, Views, People, Vineyard, Harvest, Events, etc.) and populate with best available high-resolution photos. Someone will need to curate your library of photos. I use this resource often for media image requests. Why is professional photography so important?
  • Content Schedule – setup and maintain a schedule for email and social media marketing. Identify content in advance – news, promos, photos, etc. This also helps me coordinate media outreach and with your marketing department.
  • Wine Club Retention – you are likely to get some cancels or credit card rejections. Offer membership suspends for 3 months, downsize club levels or at least keep them on the general email list for future “we want you back” campaigns.

I believe the 2020 pandemic will trigger an industry-wide transition to more meaningful digital and social communications, and most importantly eCommerce as a profitable channel. Not all wineries will get it done. Those that do will be in a better position going forward.

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Meridith May – Somm Journal & Tasting Panel Magazines

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing “Expert Opinion” series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

MERIDITH MAY is the owner of two national U.S. wine and spirits trade publications: The SOMM Journal and THE TASTING PANEL Magazine. She is responsible for the publications’ branding and content. She has successfully increased each national magazine’s readership to reach over 65,000 bi-monthly for SOMM Journal and over 70,000 hospitality industry professionals 8 times a year for The Tasting Panel.

Meridith’s career in the media spans over 30 years. She began as VP Marketing for Los Angeles-based KIIS FM/KRLA radio in the 1980s working with such notable on-air personalities as Charlie Tuna, The Real Don Steele and Rick Dees.

Segueing into food and wine, she was the restaurant columnist for the Santa Barbara News Press from 1998-2001 and then took the role as Senior Editor at Patterson’s Beverage Journal where she ran the magazine until 2007, when she purchased the name, with partner Anthony Dias Blue, and began The Tasting Panel, which has evolved as the nation’s leading national wine and spirits industry magazine.

You can follow Somm Journal on Facebook and Twitter, and read the digital editions at https://www.sommjournal.com/ and Tasting Panel Magazine on Facebook & Twitter, and online at https://www.tastingpanelmag.com/

Professional Background

What are the challenges of being both publisher and contributor to your publications?

My first job is to promote the publication: through events, ad sales and other opportunities for our marketing partners. That means I have less and less time to write as the mags grow. I have a wonderful resource of fine writers and that helps us get lots of other voices to contribute.

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I began as a restaurant columnist – and the progression was natural. But my real foray into wine writing was when I became Editor of Patterson’s Beverage Journal back in 2000. I got to interview the experts and the best in the industry!

What are your primary story interests?

Education, education, entertainment and…did I mention education? Wine and spirits brands need platforms for the trade – but hopefully the story behind every liquid can be compelling.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

I was America’s First Professional Lady Monster Truck Driver back in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. That was my weekend gig. During the week I was VP/Marketing for KIIS-FM Los Angeles and then KRLA/KLSX Los Angeles.

What haven’t you done, that you’d like to do?

Spend more time in France and Italy without worrying about business. But I don’t think that will happen.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

Since we write for the professional, we need to position our articles on how they can use this in their careers – whether they be buyers, importers or distributors. So, learning about production and regions is important, but also the business of wine and how-to mentor – how to educate your staff – how to work on that bottom line. For reviews, it’s obviously subjective but I am asked to do this by the wineries to help showcase their labels – I am sent hundreds of wines a month. Not many of them make it into the books.

Do you work on an editorial schedule or develop story ideas as they come up?

We plan our layout for editorial about four months out – some features are planned a year ahead (like cover stories). We try to be spontaneous when it comes to the actual messaging, and that’s where deadlines help.

How often do you write versus assign paid articles (not your blog)?

I write 10% and assign 90%

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

DON’T TALK ABOUT YOUR SCORES TO JOURNALISTS! That’s a turn off. And talk slowly and don’t name drop – and if you do, please spell names out or explain who you’re talking about. Don’t assume the writer knows all your technical references either.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

They know their clients – they can help with direction for the writers – and make life easier for client and journalist.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

With my dog. And if I am traveling on days off, it’s either scouting out restaurants or, yes, wineries.

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

South of France

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).