Amy Glynn, Poet, Essayist, Wine Writer

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Amy Glynn is an award-winning poet and essayist whose work appears widely in journals and anthologies including The Best American Poetry. She has written about wine (and other things) for Paste Magazine since 2013. Amy currently serves as poet laureate for the cities of Orinda and Lafayette CA.

You can follow Amy on Facebook and Twitter, and read her stories and reviews on Paste Magazine.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

Through poetry. I’m a literary writer by training, and wine is essentially metaphor in a bottle. As it turns out I have a good palate, so the leap was pretty obvious.

What are your primary story interests?

I am a natural history nerd, so I like getting into deep detail about different varietals’ histories, where they come from, why they’ve traveled (or not), who first cultivated them, that kind of thing. I enjoy demystifying wine and bringing under-recognized regions, techniques or grapes into clearer focus. I don’t especially care about “trends” or cults of personality. I love everything else.

Are you a staff columnist or freelance? What are the advantages of both?

I’ve been both. I started writing freelance for Paste Magazine in 2013, and in 2015 they made me a full-time staff writer reporting to drink, film and tv sections (yes, wine and TV. It’s as glamorous as it sounds). Recently my outlet decided full-time staff writers were a drain on the bottom line and now I am again freelancing.

Advantages of both? Honestly, I cannot say this loudly enough: Freelancing bites. As a staff writer I didn’t make a particularly fabulous salary but I had a salary, which enabled me to be much more open, expansive, and reactive to inbound pitches than I am able to be when every piece I file has to be OK’ed in advance and accounted for in a piecework budget. Articles I pour huge amounts of energy into fetch $100 (sometimes less) before taxes. It would take over 150 such articles just to pay CA property taxes on a modest home, so do the math. Add to this, no healthcare, no expectation of even notional stability, no consistent community or sense of making a valued contribution. There might be some type of writer for whom freelancing is the better option but I cannot imagine it. It is flat-out impossible to do your best work under those circumstances.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

I’m a great jazz singer. Seriously.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your writing about wine?

All kinds of things, but much of it boils down to this: That while it is almost infinitely complicated in some ways, wine is just not hard to understand or appreciate. It doesn’t require gnostic initiation, special training, a degree, or any rarefied skill set. You’ll get a more nuanced appreciation of it with some study, to be sure, but no one has to – you can just drink it and like what you like without justification. It’s a lot like poetry that way too.

If you weren’t writing about wine for a living, what would you be doing?  

“For a living.” You’re hilarious.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I’m not sure I have one unified approach, but it starts with the wine itself. I get a lot of pitches from publicists about corporate collaborations and celebrity endorsements and kitschy packaging and I am slightly baffled by the idea that there are people for whom those things matter. Maybe most often I get introduced to a producer or a region I’m not that familiar with and something just clicks. Once I personally want to know more, it’s an easy leap to think perhaps other people do too.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up?

Both.

Do you consider yourself an Influencer? What’s the difference today between a writer and an influencer in your opinion?

As a peak brat-pack Gen X-er, I consider “influencer” to be code for a kind of content (and a kind of human, in some cases) that’s exactly how I wouldn’t want to be thought of. I am absolutely not an influencer. I’m a writer. Good writers should be influential and occasionally we are, but my goal isn’t to influence anyone, it’s to communicate, and hopefully to provoke curiosity and increase knowledge and understanding in some way.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

The big one: Think twice about pitching a writer whose work you have not bothered to read. And if you do it anyway and they don’t respond? They are passing on your pitch. No need to continue asking. We get dozens, scores, in some cases hundreds of these emails a week. If we’re interested, believe me, you’ll know. And once we have a relationship it’s absolutely no problem to check in; this applies to cold leads.

Please be direct, honest, even blunt about what you are hoping for and how you think I can help you. The more I understand about where someone is coming from beyond the vicissitude-rife notion of “visibility” the more I can collaborate. I’ve been invited on costly press trips where the reality is, that region’s wines are not being made commercially available to my readers. (For a travel writer that might not be as much of an issue but in my case, the relevance goes way down once I’m talking about something no one in the US will be able to find.) Even being direct about your awkwardly-political constraints is helpful. Not long ago I was kind of upbraided and asked to delete a social media post because I had hashtagged a word the rep associated with a rival DOC. The word also had a common-parlance meaning so I was kind of perplexed (and to be honest, irritated; see above re: we do not work for you). Had the rep candidly shared with me what the underlying issue was, I would probably have been all too happy to accommodate it, but instead there was a pointlessly high-friction exchange that made dinner uncomfortable that night. The truth is your friend.

Happily, I don’t deal with this all the time, but… Sometimes I wish producers and their reps would bear in mind that I do not work for them. Sometimes when people send costly samples or invite writers to swanky events or shower us with swag (which we usually love, don’t get me wrong) they seem to develop the understandable but incorrect sense that they have in some subtle way paid for an advertorial. It doesn’t, shouldn’t and cannot work that way, and it’s very difficult to navigate when that happens.

Winemakers are passionate about what they do. They want everyone to love what they do as well –who doesn’t? When something is a labor of love it is painful when it goes unacknowledged. But sometimes I get more samples than I can quickly process, or your wine wasn’t to my personal taste and I would rather not be pressed about it, or I am working for an outlet that isn’t receptive or is behind on the calendar or whose needs have abruptly shifted… for any number of reasons you might not get what you want out of me. Probably I feel bad about that already, so treading lightly is appreciated.

Can you explain why samples sent by wineries sometimes don’t get reviewed?

I have received samples of a great many good wines I have not yet featured, and the reasons range from “for some esoteric reason it didn’t feel like it fit in this roundup” to “really similar to something else on this list” to “my bad, I forgot to include that one” to “I did include it and the editor trimmed the piece, and did so arbitrarily” to “no freaking reason on earth.” “I don’t love this wine” does come up as well, and in that case I assume you’d prefer me to quietly pass versus give your baby a negative review.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

Good publicists can make a writer’s life sooo much easier in so many ways, providing insights and access to products I might not know about (or might not be able to afford on my own), facilitating the flow of information and providing context. A rep who is honest and candid and paying attention is an invaluable asset.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

I have kids, so spending time with them is a priority. When money allows I love to travel, I love theater and live music, and in the past I’ve had some unforgettable experiences at writers’ conferences. I garden a lot, and I enjoy entertaining­–having a group of friends wander over on a weekend afternoon to hang out in the backyard, cook and open some nice bottles? That’s an entirely satisfactory way to spend a day off. In reality, my “down” time is also what I have available to do my non-commercial writing, so that ends up getting privileged quite often.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

Hard to narrow down. The first time I read Randall Grahm’s tasting notes at Bonny Doon was eye-opening. Tasting a flight of Gary Farrell Pinots with Teresa Heredia was likewise. The first orange wine I ever tasted (late bloomer) was a revelation (it was Donkey and Goat’s skin-contact Roussanne, “Stonecrusher”). But as a whole experience, maybe it’s this:

It’s 5pm, and four of us have rolled into San Gimignano in the unfortunate position of having skipped lunch. We are starving. Loath to be the American tourists looking for dinner at 5, but starving. Finally we find a place that’s open and get a table on the sidewalk, and proceed to order a bottle of local Supertuscan while we devour some painfully unsalted bread. An old man is watching us while he smokes a cigarette, one bootheel up on the wall he’s leaning against. He watches us as the server pours the wine, no doubt sneering inwardly at our gauche ways. The wine’s delicious and everyone launches into an animated discussion of its virtues. The old man stubs out the cigarette and approaches. “You like the wine?” he asks with an impenetrable Tuscan accent. We do! It’s fabulous. “I make the wine,” he says. “Ah, you make wine?” “I make this wine,” he said, and we all had a crazy linguistically challenged discussion of its characteristics. It was such an only-in-Italy moment, but also, there I was assuming the dude was laughing at us for being rubes when he was actually dying to know if we thought his Sangiovese was worth buying. It was great to get that reminder.

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

I’m not sure I can narrow to one region, but the one-word answer is “Italy.”

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Howard Hewitt, Newspaper Editor/Writer

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

Howard Hewitt is a retired writer, marketer, and digital marketing professional located in Indianapolis, In. He now works part time in retail wine sales. Howard spent 22 years in the newspaper industry and capped his career as a suburban editor for the Indianapolis Star. He wrote an every-other-week column from the fall of 2007 to October of 2018. He still writes occasional features for his more-than-20 newspapers and a few specialty publications. He is active on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. His site is: www.howardhewitt.net

You can follow Howard on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter, and read his stories and reviews at www.howardhewitt.net.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I developed an interest in wine in the 1990s. We all start innocently enough. For me, it was Riunite when I made a little pasta. From their I graduated to Rieslings – and thought the Germans were way better than everyone else. Who knew I had an aptitude for vino?

I came to writing as a career choice. Though I spent most of my career as a newspaper editor, I was writing the entire 22 professional years and beyond. I worked at small town newspapers as a reporter, writer, editor, and a short stint as a publisher. I continued to write for 14 years before retiring in late 2016, then working in the marketing  departments of Wabash College and Purdue University.

What are your primary story interests?

I most enjoy the story about the people in the wine industry. Let’s face it, wine is made largely through the same process but no two winemakers are alike. Sure, there are twists and different techniques in wine making but people that make decisions to try something different hold the most interest for me.

Is it possible to make a living as a wine writer today? If so, how have you succeeded? If not, why not? What are the primary challenges and hurdles you face?

No, no, … just not enough paying opportunities – and it was never a goal.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

For quite a few years I was a B-level competitive racquetball player. I also rode Century (100 mile) bike rides in the early 1990s.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your writing about wine?

I would hope that readers would pick up on the sense of adventure in wine. There is always something new to try or a twist on an old favorite. I have always tried to educate too, about visiting wine country anywhere in the world and how to make the most of your trip.

If you weren’t writing about wine for a living, what would you be doing?

Features on interesting people.

What’s the best story you have written? Please provide a link.

Not sure about best – I have several I really liked. This is one of those:

https://howardhewitt.net/2016/03/27/olivers-pinot-a-statement-wine/

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I hardly ever do wine reviews any more other than Vivino, the phone app. I’m just not sure another opinion is needed in all of the fog of ratings and such. I use Vivino because that’s for the geeky people anyway. And since I now work a bit part-time in retail wine, I do get asked often about my wine preferences.

My approach to writing is probably different than many as a career journalist. I want the wine sources to tell the story as much, or preferably, more than me. When I started writing in 2007, I thought there was way too much first person in wine writing. The writing then was way too much about what the author thought and not nearly enough from winemakers or winery owners.

Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up?

Every other week schedule when I was doing column. As they come up now.

Do you post your articles on social media? Why is that important?

I have posted to social media for years. It draws attention to my work. I honestly believe blogs are quickly becoming a thing of the past. I might have 100 or more view a blog post, but I have nearly 2,000 friends on Facebook.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

Accessibility is always a key issue. May I talk to the winemaker? Is the owner available for a brief chat? The more authoritative people the winery can offer a writer the better they are going to like the final result.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

I think it is mainly an advantage. The publicist not only can get the necessary access but help ‘coach up’ the winery spokesperson on how to best take advantage of a good marketing/PR opportunity. At the same time the publicist can help guide the journalists with a few questions or areas of interest to the interview subject. The publicist can also manage a winery’s expectations.

Conversely, the publicist works for the winery. The best men and women in the field maintain an important distance to the process so the writer doesn’t feel he or she is being used strictly to market a bottle or two.

What frustrates you most about working on winery stories and/or wine reviews?

Does anyone really care about my opinion (when writing reviews)?

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

In recent years my time off has often been related to wine. I took a group to Burgundy in 2016, a smaller group to Oregon in the fall of 2016 and did a short visit to Oregon in the fall of 2018. I love going to wine-producing regions but think in 2019 I’d like to take the time to better appreciate the history and culture of those regions – beyond wine.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

That’s a tough one because I’ve been fortunate. Near the top would be a fall press trip to Chablis. Not only did our small group have access to winemakers, but we were there for the annual fall festival. We were able to take part in the multi-part formal dinner with lots and lots of Chablis. The locals named the four of us from the US. Chabliesiennes.

Pick one red and one white to drink for the next month with every dinner

Pinot Noir and White Burgundy

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

Oregon

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Winery Photography – Why it’s SO Important!

Note: this is the full length article. A shorter version of this ran on April 1st in Oregon Wine Press: https://www.oregonwinepress.com/the-bigger-picture

Professional photography can be expensive – anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars – which explains why a client of mine recently balked at the suggestion they hire a professional photographer and build a multi-purpose photo gallery. “iPhone photos are good quality, why can’t we just use those? Are photos so important? Do people really care?” They are, and they do, I offered.

Image based marketing is important because people are reading less. Photos with captions and Instagram posts have taken the place of winery blogs. Newsletters with real winery news are replaced with fast facts and images of events and wine promos.

When working with the media, know that writers prefer to focus on their written interviews and appreciate knowing that the winery has invested in high resolution photography, as their editors typically require photos with proper attribution. Most Online publications do not have photographers on staff and often rely on writers to take or source photos, while Print publications will request high-res large file size images to run with articles.

I talked to Jason Kaplan of Jason E Kaplan Photography about the importance of high-resolution quality photography for wineries. “Wineries can build their brands through storytelling. Images are so important to creating narratives that create an emotional connection to the business. This could be especially true for properties that host events. Even for ones that don’t, people like the opportunity to look behind the curtain and see how things are actually done.” Well said.

I also wanted perspective from a designer and developer, so I asked Shery Rice of Greenhouse for comments. “Consumers don’t always recognize when they are seeing a great photograph. But they know instinctively when they are seeing a bad one—they cannot personally connect with the image and are not inspired to further interaction. The production value of your photography makes a subliminal statement to consumers about how you value your own offerings and leads them to the next unconscious steps in assessing whether or not to pursue your brand further.”

For the reasons stated above, I suggest the following. Photos should be high resolution, and formatted for print, website, and Instagram/social media.

  1. Photo Gallery on the Website – add this page to Main Menu or in the Website Footer. You can use these categories or folders to organize – Seasons, Harvest, Crush, Vineyard, Aerial photos, Winery, Tasting Room, People, Events, Club, Winemaker dinners, etc.
  2. Photo Gallery on the website Trade & Media page – same as #1, or use an anchor link to #1
  3. Dropbox – share link to winery approved photos for use by qualified media – all of the above plus logos, bottle shots*, label images, shelf talkers, headshots and other winery assets

Someone should be assigned to curate this Photo Library which includes items #1, #2 and #3. Marketing will draw from these winery images (owned media) for email newsletters, social media posts, event listings, advertising, print collateral, and the list goes on.

If you decide to work with a photographer, be sure to obtain the original high-resolution image files for print collateral such as logos and labels. The highest resolution are vector files which are completely expandable to any size. Image files in a .TIFF format are also very high resolution and ideal for enlarging an image, and .JPG or .JPEG work well for websites and social media.

Photo resolution and file size are very important, and they vary depending on whether you will be printing, enlarging, using on website or posting on Instagram and social media. Be sure to ask a professional photographer for guidance. I suggest you ask for images in three sizes – print, website and social media. Also ask if image size, aspect ratio and color space can be adjusted and if there are additional fees.

It’s also important to have the rights to your own photos, so attribution goes to your winery instead of to a photographer. This is something you would need to discuss and would only happen for paid engagements. It is less likely that a professional photographer will give you rights if they are doing a pro bono shoot or trading their time for wine. It is also a lot safer to own your own image media than using other people’s social media post images, even though they exist in the public domain.

*Note: Bottle shots are a specialty shoot and should be done by a professional in a studio. I prefer transparent background. I also like vintages removed using Photoshop, which makes the bottle images reusable. Evergreen photography is good.

This article originally appeared in Oregon Wine Press, the April print and digital editions: https://www.oregonwinepress.com/the-bigger-picture

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s enjoyed 11 years of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations and communications consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

 

 

 

Covid, Community & Commerce

The emergence of online engagement and eCommerce 

Many wineries, business partners and consumers are at home in some form of quarantine or under stay at home restrictions. This is a communications opportunity – to interact with other tasting room and wine industry professionals on social media – as well as with your customers, and not just to sell wine. Consumers will want to know what’s going on with the winery, and may be interested in engaging with you online. DTC marketing outreach by old school mail, email and social media will keep people informed and updated, as well as offer them online opportunities to enjoy your wines shipped direct to their homes.

Be authentic and genuine. What is Your Brand really all about? I’m reading that people don’t want more pitches for wine, but want to know what the winery is doing to accommodate followers and community during the crisis. I would hedge a little on promos, and err on the side of subtlety and indirect offers, by focusing on wine education and entertainment experiences which are brand appropriate.

Is this the long-awaited inflection point to meaningful winery eCommerce? Now is the time for wineries to find creative ways to shift their business models and shift their sales channel strategies. The last 10 years saw an adjustment from reliance on distribution sales to selling Consumer Direct. Small producers with fully established DTC programs are the most affected by this disruption and many are reacting very quickly and creatively with online solutions. I think this will be the point of transition for those wineries that have not fully embraced eCommerce, to establish online sales as a significant and ongoing part of their DTC programs.

In addition to curbside pickup and drop-off services, there has been lots of interest and many calls for Virtual Tastings from the winery associations and the media. They are looking for events that are part of your programming, so scheduling and publishing well in advance – to allow for system testing (Facebook Live, Instagram Live, Zoom, Skype, etc.) and presentation practice is important, as well as providing ample time for shipping if customers are interested in acquiring specific wines for the event. From my perspective, this could and should become part of your ongoing DTC program – post pandemic – to reach out-of-state and other targeted groups, i.e. consumers, out of state club members, trade or media – so why not get a program in place now and take a leadership position?

I also suggest you do the math and focus on “Shipping Included” promotions versus discounts. Develop a progressive schedule of different packages and gift packs for instance. Consider which wines to offer for virtual tasting events featuring winemaker and staff. You might be surprised at people’s willingness to meet and taste with you online – with either your wines or for wine education. Finally, remember the phone? I know its old school, but the human voice is reassuring. Keep your staff engaged by having them contact your best customers, not just club members. Check to see how they are doing, let them know what’s happening at the winery – and just this one time – don’t ask or mention selling them wine. You might be surprised at the results.

Here are some best practice marketing articles I’ve read that you may find helpful:

For my part as a publicist, I’m focused on shipping wines to reviewers across the U.S., not only the large national publications but also critics and writers whose opinion matters. Their reports and reviews will help my clients stay top of mind and provide important content to support their marketing efforts. I’ll also reschedule canceled March and April visits, and hopefully start booking media tours again late spring, early summer. That’s my best guess timing at this point. Of course, pitching client stories to national and regional outlets including magazines, broadcast and radio seemingly never ends.

Things that wineries can do on the digital and marketing side are:

  • Website – update all pages with current information, virtual offers and photos. Position the site as if you are an online only business, with tasting room and in person experiences coming soon. Special focus now should be on the shopping cart and mobile shopping experience. Is the site fully responsive? If not fix that. What shipping or “quarantine” promos can you run to capture online sales?
  • Photo Gallery – setup or update your gallery by category (Seasons, Views, People, Vineyard, Harvest, Events, etc.) and populate with best available high-resolution photos. Someone will need to curate your library of photos. I use this resource often for media image requests. Why is professional photography so important?
  • Content Schedule – setup and maintain a schedule for email and social media marketing. Identify content in advance – news, promos, photos, etc. This also helps me coordinate media outreach and with your marketing department.
  • Wine Club Retention – you are likely to get some cancels or credit card rejections. Offer membership suspends for 3 months, downsize club levels or at least keep them on the general email list for future “we want you back” campaigns.

I believe the 2020 pandemic will trigger an industry-wide transition to more meaningful digital and social communications, and most importantly eCommerce as a profitable channel. Not all wineries will get it done. Those that do will be in a better position going forward.

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Meridith May – Somm Journal & Tasting Panel Magazines

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing “Expert Opinion” series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

MERIDITH MAY is the owner of two national U.S. wine and spirits trade publications: The SOMM Journal and THE TASTING PANEL Magazine. She is responsible for the publications’ branding and content. She has successfully increased each national magazine’s readership to reach over 65,000 bi-monthly for SOMM Journal and over 70,000 hospitality industry professionals 8 times a year for The Tasting Panel.

Meridith’s career in the media spans over 30 years. She began as VP Marketing for Los Angeles-based KIIS FM/KRLA radio in the 1980s working with such notable on-air personalities as Charlie Tuna, The Real Don Steele and Rick Dees.

Segueing into food and wine, she was the restaurant columnist for the Santa Barbara News Press from 1998-2001 and then took the role as Senior Editor at Patterson’s Beverage Journal where she ran the magazine until 2007, when she purchased the name, with partner Anthony Dias Blue, and began The Tasting Panel, which has evolved as the nation’s leading national wine and spirits industry magazine.

You can follow Somm Journal on Facebook and Twitter, and read the digital editions at https://www.sommjournal.com/ and Tasting Panel Magazine on Facebook & Twitter, and online at https://www.tastingpanelmag.com/

Professional Background

What are the challenges of being both publisher and contributor to your publications?

My first job is to promote the publication: through events, ad sales and other opportunities for our marketing partners. That means I have less and less time to write as the mags grow. I have a wonderful resource of fine writers and that helps us get lots of other voices to contribute.

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I began as a restaurant columnist – and the progression was natural. But my real foray into wine writing was when I became Editor of Patterson’s Beverage Journal back in 2000. I got to interview the experts and the best in the industry!

What are your primary story interests?

Education, education, entertainment and…did I mention education? Wine and spirits brands need platforms for the trade – but hopefully the story behind every liquid can be compelling.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

I was America’s First Professional Lady Monster Truck Driver back in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. That was my weekend gig. During the week I was VP/Marketing for KIIS-FM Los Angeles and then KRLA/KLSX Los Angeles.

What haven’t you done, that you’d like to do?

Spend more time in France and Italy without worrying about business. But I don’t think that will happen.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

Since we write for the professional, we need to position our articles on how they can use this in their careers – whether they be buyers, importers or distributors. So, learning about production and regions is important, but also the business of wine and how-to mentor – how to educate your staff – how to work on that bottom line. For reviews, it’s obviously subjective but I am asked to do this by the wineries to help showcase their labels – I am sent hundreds of wines a month. Not many of them make it into the books.

Do you work on an editorial schedule or develop story ideas as they come up?

We plan our layout for editorial about four months out – some features are planned a year ahead (like cover stories). We try to be spontaneous when it comes to the actual messaging, and that’s where deadlines help.

How often do you write versus assign paid articles (not your blog)?

I write 10% and assign 90%

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

DON’T TALK ABOUT YOUR SCORES TO JOURNALISTS! That’s a turn off. And talk slowly and don’t name drop – and if you do, please spell names out or explain who you’re talking about. Don’t assume the writer knows all your technical references either.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

They know their clients – they can help with direction for the writers – and make life easier for client and journalist.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

With my dog. And if I am traveling on days off, it’s either scouting out restaurants or, yes, wineries.

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

South of France

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Tom Wark, Wine Industry Blogger, Pundit, Activist

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a monthly Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing “Expert Opinion” series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

TOM WARK is wine industry marketing and media relations specialist. He founded his Wark Communications consultancy in 1994 and has worked with numerous wineries, media firms, wine tech companies and associations. He is a founder of the Wine Bloggers Conference, the founder of the American Wine Blog Awards, and a longtime champion of alternative wine voices in the media. Wark also serves as the executive director of the National Association of Wine Retailers. He lives in Salem with his wife Kathy and son Henry George. He can be contacted via www.warkcommunications.com

You can follow Tom on Facebook and Twitter, and read his stories and reviews on Fermentation Wine Blog.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

I came to wine originally through a career in marketing and public relations. My original intent was to follow my interest in how the structures of diplomacy and history impact our everyday lives into academia. However, life interrupted that plan, and I needed to leave the University and get a job. I choose Marketing, which implied public relations, which opened my eyes to the existence of wine-related PR firms. I joined a wine PR firm in 1990 and opened my own consultancy in 1994.

Ten years into my career and having invested time into the politics of wine via my work in Wine PR, I wanted to explore more deeply that intersection of politics, culture, media, business and wine. Blogging services were then just emerging and that made the creation and maintenance of an online publishing venture possible and affordable.

What are you primary story interests?

I’m primarily interested in the alcohol regulatory structure, the politics of alcohol, wine marketing, wine media and communications and the ways wine works its way into the cultural zeitgeist.

What are you primary palate preferences?

My drinking preferences are vast. I love drinking bourbon straight and have spent considerable time working to perfect a Manhattan recipe. I adore Dry Cider. I’m more partial to wines with a body and structure akin to Pinot and Sauvignon Blanc, however, give me a richly structured California Cab and I’m also happy.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

I was adopted at birth. Both my parents were products of a Midwestern, protestant upraising, of the Depression and of WWII. It was a very traditional home I grew up in. Much later in my life, through DNA testing, I not only discovered I was half Jewish biologically, but I also discovered who my biological mother was via an email that arrived in my In-Box one day with a subject heading that read: “You’ve Got New DNA Matches”. That was interesting.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your wine writing?

While it’s true that money talks, a large group of consumers speaking in unison can mute the voice of money.

What’s the best story you have written? Please provide a link.

There are two I like in particular. One about my mother and a manifesto for change:

https://fermentationwineblog.com/2009/05/of-memories-of-broken-glass-mothers/

https://fermentationwineblog.com/2010/03/manifesto-for-change-in-the-wine-industry/

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I don’t review wine, however I do post at FERMENTATION very regularly. I’m an opinion writer/polemicist. So, I’m generally writing to convince or influence and my writing style reflects that orientation. As a result, I come off sometimes as a curmudgeon or a muckraker.

Do you work on an editorial schedule or develop story ideas as they come up?

If I didn’t have a day job as a wine publicist and marketer, I’d probably be posting 4 or 5 times a day at FERMENTATION. So much comes across my desk each day that deserves attention or speaks to my irony detector or my bullshit detector. In addition, I often come across new voices in the wine media that really deserve a spotlight and I like to focus my attention and writing on them. So, while I don’t have a schedule for writing and posting, I’m constantly and automatically forming opinions and views on most of what comes into my line of sight and when it does, I tend to immediately get writing.

Do you post your articles on social media? Why is that important?

I use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn to push out my posts for the simple reason that this is where people’s attention is focused today.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

Tell the truth first and foremost. Second, if a winery or any wine industry business uses media relations as a marketing tool, it’s critical to focus on a small set of stories to tell the media, then carefully understand which writers are most likely to be interested in and cover those stories.

What advantages are there for wineries working directly with a wine media professional like yourself?

If a winery understands how positive media coverage can bolster its sales, brand and marketing, then working with someone like myself who has spent decades forming professional relationships with writers and editors, watching how they work and understanding what kind of stories they cover, a winery can follow a much more efficient path to garnering coverage in the right media.

Which wine personalities would you like to meet/taste with (living or dead)?

Having gotten into the wine industry right when email began being used regularly, there are a number of wine folks I’ve gotten to know via email and phone, but never laid eyes on. Among those who I’d love to sit down with and break bread are Elizabeth Schneider of Wine For Normal People, Robert Parker, Jr., Matt Kramer, and Andrew Jefford.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

I have a four-year-old boy named Henry George. So, when I’m not working I like to spend time discussing with him which types of dinosaurs or snakes we’d like to live with or exploring the architectural promise of Legos, Lincoln Logs and blocks. I’m also an avid golfer and enjoy cooking the classics.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

It’s not so much a “wine tasting experience” as it is a drinking experience. It was the first time I met my wife at Press in Saint Helena. I spent 3 hours sitting at the bar, drinking Pastis and talking with Kathy. I knew inside those three hours she was it. I only learned later that she wasn’t so impressed with me as I was with her. I eventually convinced her otherwise.

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

Michael Cervin, Writer, Author, Critic

Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Advisor.

MICHAEL CERVIN is a freelance writer based in Santa Barbara, California. Michael is an author and speaker focused on wine, spirits, food, water and travel. He is a contributor to multiple outlets including Bonforts, Forbes Travel Guides, BottledWaterWeb. Decanter (London), Fine Wine & Liquor (China), The Hollywood Reporter, The Tasting Panel, Arroyo Monthly, 65 Degrees, Gayot.com, IntoWine.com, and many others. He is the author of 7 books.

You can follow Michael on Facebook and Twitter, and read his stories and reviews on Boozehoundz.

Professional Background

How did you come to wine, and to wine writing?

Wine came into my life when I left Los Angeles and moved to Santa Barbara. I got a part time job at a winery tasting room and knew nothing. Many of the people who I poured for had traveled the world and helped to educate me, as did the winemaker. So, I started tasting everything and when I wrote my very first wine article, which was horrible by the way – about me driving aimlessly in my convertible visiting wineries in the Santa Ynez Valley. I was paid a mere $20. My third article was for Wine & Spirits so I jumped pretty quickly up the ladder.

What are your primary story interests?

I’m interested in authenticity, quirkiness, an emotional connection. That can be about a wine or winery, a place, person etc. My best wine articles have been in depth one-on-one conversations with people who hold nothing back. Though these types of interviews are more time consuming, I find that I get those true nuggets that I am mining for when me and my subject have time to just talk. I do feel like a lot of press releases these days are a kind of “forced narrative,” where they are trying to be quirky or outrageous for its own sake. But that is transparent.

Are you a staff columnist or freelance? What are the advantages of both?

For wine I’ve always been freelance. I do have columns for my Cocktail of the Month for a magazine in Pasadena, and for my reviews for The Whiskey Reviewer, as well as my wine reviews for Bonfort’s and Drink Me Magazine, and IntoWine.com. However, they all afford me complete editorial latitude. I understand the prestige of being on staff at one of the major wine mags, but I’ve also been the kind of writer who wants to do what I want, when I want and how I want. This becomes difficult because people want to pigeonhole you and for my diversity of writing, it confuses people. I write about wine, spirits, but also water issues, architecture, travel, food, history. As a freelancer I am not beholden to anything and I like that. It also allows for more transparency and honesty in my writing.

Personal Background

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

Perhaps that I was formerly an actor appearing with speaking parts on shows like 3rd Rock From the Sun, The Young and The Restless, Grace Under Fire, and the soap opera (perhaps ironically, since this is where I live) Santa Barbara. I also did a lot of theatre and wrote and directed several plays and was Associate Artistic Director for a small theatre in Hollywood. I kinda miss it.

What is one thing you’d like your readers to learn from your wine writing?

That you need to constantly explore. Rather than your “go-to” Cabernet, try another region. Don’t care for Vermentino? Try a different producer. With as many wines available to us, it’s staggering to me that most people drink myopically. I hear it all the time; I only drink Brand X Syrah; I hate rose’; I only drink reds, etc. If we limit our experiences, we lose our palate. When I was the restaurant critic for the Santa Barbara News Press I had to try foods either I didn’t like, or would normally not eat. But I was always objective and it forced my palate to be open and I can say that was one of the best experiences because I learned to compartmentalize it. I can appreciate, for example, fresh white asparagus though I would not usually eat it. With wine it’s the same. Additionally, wherever you travel, always try the local wines, beers, spirits and food. Don’t order your favorite California Cabernet if you’re in Austria.

Writing Process

Can you describe your approach to wine writing and/or doing wine reviews?

I look for a wine to invite me somewhere. I open bottles every day and in that ritual of peeling off the foil, uncorking, or twisting off the cap I always think the same thing – please let this be a cool wine, a wine I can give a great score to so that others might try it. I love the discovery, that first sip, looking for that visceral experience of being transported. I use Riedel glasses for all wines and when opened, I slowly pour a thin stream into the glass to help with immediate aeration. Obviously, I smell it, 2-3 times, then take that first sip. And really, that first sip is pretty much all that matters. If it doesn’t grab you, take hold of your senses, intrigue you or demand your attention, then I have little use for it.

Do you work on an editorial schedule or develop story ideas as they come up?

Probably 90% of my work is based on my own ideas and I generate a lot of stories. I tell younger writers who say, “how do you come up with story ideas?” that if you don’t have 20 ideas in your head right now, maybe you should be doing something else. Ideas are literally everywhere and you need to think beyond the confines of what a traditional story is about. Frankly, ideas are easy. Getting paid for those ideas is not.

Working Relationships

What are your recommendations to wineries when working with journalists?

Simple – respond. If I call or email it’s for a reason – I need information to help promote your winery. Far too many wineries (both large and small) ignore media for reasons I cannot understand. Some don’t want to be bothered. I’m weary of wineries telling me they can’t respond because they have a small staff, or have limited resources. You know what? I’m a staff of one and I work constantly, so if you hear from me, respond in a timely manner. I have, quite literally, not written about a wine or winery precisely because they chose to ignore me. Then their story goes to someone else. It’s really simple.

What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?

Also simple – they respond. There are a number of wine PR people that I have worked with for 20 years. It can (and should) be a mutually beneficial relationship. And that’s the key word to both these questions – relationships. I’m interested in building and cultivating long-term relationship with wines, winery owners and producers. But it takes two to tango to use an overwrought phrase. Many PR firms simply want to get a score out of me as quickly as possible. I don’t work that way. I’m in it for the long haul.

Leisure Time

If you take days off, how do you spend them? 

Being a freelancer, I am not beholden to time. If I want to go to the beach or have a leisurely lunch, I can. This also means that there are times I’m at my desk at 4 a.m. writing in solitude and, quite frankly, I love the quietness of the mornings – this is my best time to write. Since I travel quite a bit, that travel tends to be a “day off” for me, though the reality is that as a writer, there is never a “day off” because writing is in my DNA. I love what I do. I recall a time when I was on a cruise with my then wife (she was speaking on the cruise) and I had scheduled to meet with two hotel properties for Forbes Travel Guides in the Bahamas when the ship was in port, even though that meant I didn’t go on a snorkeling trip, but it really didn’t bother me because I love what I do, and I got to see a part of the Island that most tourists don’t.

What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?

That’s easy. I was invited to Champagne Bollinger for their launch of their Gallerie 1829 (a kind of museum at their property in Aÿ) not open to the public. I was fortunate to taste through a structured tasting of older vintages including 1992, 1975, 1973 (in jeroboam, magnum and bottle), 1964, 1955, 1928 and 1914. It was a singular, distinct, wonderful experience and what I recall most was that at lunch after the tasting, where all the Champagnes were opened for us, I drank the 1914, all the while thinking – this was made before World War I, and here I am over 100 years later, this time in a peaceful France, drinking a wine that has survived for a century. Though the 1928 was more fresh and effervescent, I gravitated to the 1914 because of its connection to world history, and because literally only perhaps 10 other people on the planet will ever get to taste the 1914 again. Ever.

What’s your favorite wine region in the world?

I’m asked all the time what my “favorite this or that” is, and I have the same response. I don’t believe in favorites; be that a type of grape, a region, or a style. The wonderful thing about wine is that it is a living organism and it changes constantly. Vintage variation, warmer summers, rainfall all effect every wine region, making that vintage unique. If you want sameness, go to a fast food joint, or drink bulk wine. If you want subtly drink wines that offer a sense of place. Having traveled the globe I pretty much love every wine region I’ve been to, including off the beaten path wine regions like Crete, Nova Scotia, Switzerland, Austria. Every place offers something truly idiosyncratic.

Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).