Winery PR Doesn’t Sell Wine!

Winery PR Doesn’t Sell Wine!

Winery PR does not directly sell wine, nor is it intended to do so. This is not a retraction from my previous article – Does Media Coverage Help Me Sell Wine? Media Relations is about showing the media real stories and wines that fit what they need or want to write about. Communications professionals and publicists help you earn media by trying to influence and facilitate that coverage.

I recently heard a tasting room staffer state “There are two types of wine. The kind you like and the kind you don’t”. I believe there is a third type – the kind you haven’t yet experienced. And that is why wine is a “Discovery” item for consumers. PR’s job is to facilitate discovery through media coverage. Therefore, PR is about lead generation not about sales generation. Unfortunately many wineries do not understand this or can’t afford to engage in a media relations campaign.

While media coverage can have an immediate impact on sales, doing these types of communications and outreach are more akin to a triathlon than a sprint, not one off projects based on cash flow need, backed up inventory, facility openings and new wine releases.

There are also those winery owners/winemakers who believe all they need are great scores in Wine Spectator to sell wine. Due to score inflation and the mountain of wines submitted (estimated 1,200 – 1,500 labels/month), even Wine Spectator scores don’t matter these days unless you receive 94+ points. What happens if your current vintage marks are sub-par? Is this when you start up your PR efforts?

What does a winery PR campaign look like?

I get inquiries all the time asking about winery PR, and what exactly do I do? The short answer is that I help wineries sell wine by generating media coverage and wine reviews for their brands. Why is that important? There are three reasons. Media coverage 1) implies endorsement from a third party authority 2) introduces your winery to new customers, who will hopefully seek out your brand and 3) provides valuable marketing content for existing customers, followers and subscribers.

  • Consumers need validation, whether from a journalist telling your story or reviewer rating your wines. You can’t rely on Spectator and Enthusiast ratings alone.
  • You can’t keep going back to the same well. There are simply too many wonderful new wineries out there and customer attrition can be brutal
  • Third party content helps you to stay connected and market to existing customers and subscribers, and reminds them of their patronage by sharing your accolades (articles, reviews, scores). More brand impressions and touch points breed the idea of familiarity and quality.

Can you afford not do have an active PR Program?

Sadly and honestly, I believe the answer is negative. Here are three current news items to consider. The big players control the game because 1) large distributors already control the second tier 2) the largest producers will soon control their own second tier 3) legislation benefits the large players the most

  • Consider the consolidation of distributors for a moment. I recently read that New York State fined Southern Glazer $3.5M for bribery, aka pay-to-play with their retailers. With this much money at stake this comes as no surprise. The current wholesaler “mob” and the largest retailers are winning at this game and small production wineries are not in play.
  • Fred Franzia of Bronco wines (Two Buck Chuck) is building its own rail and freight systems to move wine direct to retailers and reduce their shipping costs. This of course increases their margins and puts additional price pressure on everyone else.
  • The recent federal reduction in winery excise tax barely benefits wineries with 5,000 cases of production. The sweet spot is about 100,000 cases if I understand the tax tables correctly. Are you one of the 85% of wineries in the U.S. with less than 5,000 cases?

So what’s a small winery to do?

The answer is not necessarily to engage in PR efforts and media campaigns, not if you aren’t ready. The answer may be to get ready quick. Here are three actionable things you can do now. I suggest you start by 1) identifying your winery’s next marketing role 2) enhancing your winery’s position in your local and regional marketing associations and 3) having your media and trade readiness evaluated by a professional consulting firm or trusted industry advisor.

  • Marketing positions might include tasting room manager (assuming you still manage TR staff) responsible for goals and functions related to consumer direct sales; direct sales manager (assuming you have a tasting room manager) responsible for all aspects of direct sales including tasting room, wine club, offsite and onsite events, and even direct to trade sales; wine club manager once you club gets to critical mass (about 500 active accounts); marketing manager (assuming you don’t have someone else with strong experience in digital marketing) responsible for all platforms including email, blogging, website maintenance, social marketing, etc.
  • Winery associations are getting more involved and getting more requests from writers, buyers and distributors, and are increasing sharing information and recommendations with members. Volunteer for the member board and participate in the marketing committees to stay ahead.
  • Are you trade and media ready?

CARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media).

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